The Angevin Empire

I m not sure why historians think that history has to be written in such a boring manner Or maybe the Angevins were simply not very interesting Either way this book was focused more on France than

I'm not sure why historians think that history has to be written in such a boring manner. Or, maybe the Angevins were simply not very interesting. Either way, this book was focused more on France than England, which is fine, except I am in the midst of a long study of English history and this sent me astray. Back to England for me. Good The Angevin Empire Creat John Gillingham Viral Ebook At its greatest extent, the Angevin Empire stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees For fifty years it was the dominant political entity and English and French history were inextricably woven together This study looks at how these disparate territories came together, how they were ruled, and whether they truly constituted an empire The new edition of thisAt its greatest extent, the Angevin Empire stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees For fifty years it was the dominant political entity and English and French history were inextricably woven together This study looks at how these disparate territories came together, how they were ruled, and whether they truly constituted an empire The new edition of this groundbreaking work has been thoroughly revised and features two new chapters.. John Gillingham is emeritus professor of medieval history at the London School of Economics and Political Science On the 19th July 2007 he was elected into the Fellowship of the British Academy He is renowned as an expert on the Angevin empire.. Good Books The Angevin Empire A very short book that I found myself wishing was a little longer when I found myself confused. But it cleared up for me and I learned a lot about the Angevins. Gillingham sees the Empire as "a family firm"--not united administratively or legally, but rather through personality. The king moved around quite frequently and made his presence known. Administrators were shifted around from place to place.“The Angevin Empire was a family firm. It existed for the benefit of the family. The interests of the family counted for more than any notion of keeping the empire intact under a single ruler. Even though there are signs of a movement towards legal and administrative uniformity, this was the result of drift, of ad hoc responses to particular problems, rather than of consciously centralising intention.” 116There was no "Angevin" culture or art. No common cultural ground between regions. Gillingham thinks that the loss of Angevin territory was inevitable eventually, even had John not lost it himself. As he writes:“The legal relationship between a king of France and a king of England who held territories on the Continent meant that it was relatively easy for the king of France to legitimize his own actions as part of a legal process. In this sense, legally speaking, the king of France always had the upper hand and it was bound to be the case that, one day, an able and aggressive king of France would find himself opposed by an inadequate opponent…In the event it proved to be fatal when one of the ablest and most ruthless kings ever to rule France happened to be opposed by one of the worst kings ever to rule England.” 125

  1. John Gillingham is emeritus professor of medieval history at the London School of Economics and Political Science On the 19th July 2007 he was elected into the Fellowship of the British Academy He is renowned as an expert on the Angevin empire.

380 Reply to “The Angevin Empire”

  1. A very short book that I found myself wishing was a little longer when I found myself confused But it cleared up for me and I learned a lot about the Angevins Gillingham sees the Empire as a family firm not united administratively or legally, but rather through personality The king moved around quite frequently and made his presence known Administrators were shifted around from place to place The Angevin Empire was a family firm It existed for the benefit of the family The interests of the famil [...]


  2. A very good introduction to the Angevin Empire which unlike many histories of this period of Angevin control takes the reader back to the beginning of the story and covers briefly the events of the Anarchy and the events that led to the formation of the Angevin Empire On the whole a thoroughly objective introductory text with Gillingham even giving King John a fair evaluation although some of his assessments commending Richard and condemning John are open to interpretation based on personal pref [...]


  3. I m not sure why historians think that history has to be written in such a boring manner Or, maybe the Angevins were simply not very interesting Either way, this book was focused on France than England, which is fine, except I am in the midst of a long study of English history and this sent me astray Back to England for me.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *