The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture

The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture Creat Daniel Harris am Ebook Daniel Harris Is a well known author some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the

The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture Creat Daniel Harris am Ebook Daniel Harris Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture book, this is one of the most wanted Daniel Harris author readers around the world. . Though many in the gay community strive to be accepted into mainstream society, assimilation is watering down a once vibrant culture, rendering it as bland as a production of Streetcar without Blanche Dubois As corporate America opens its arms and the gay population comes running, the commercialization of gay culture makes it conventional imagine Valley of the Dolls withThough many in the gay community strive to be accepted into mainstream society, assimilation is watering down a once vibrant culture, rendering it as bland as a production of Streetcar without Blanche Dubois As corporate America opens its arms and the gay population comes running, the commercialization of gay culture makes it conventional imagine Valley of the Dolls with MM s.In this provocative, brilliantly reasoned book, charged throughout with a penetrating eye and stinging wit, Daniel Harris examines the many shadings of the gay experience as they have evolved over time, including the demise of camp and kink, the evolution of personal ads, the origins of the underwear revolution, the changing face of porn and glossy magazines, the morph of drag queens and leathermen, and the marketing of AIDS as commodity.. Popular Books The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture The central claim of this book is that since Stonewall, whatever it is that has formed and shaped gay culture has transformed. Well, of course; such a thing is inevitable when the people that make up a culture move from being hidden and shameful to being public and proud. Harris's argument, though, is that such gay cultural artifacts as diva worship, camp, drag, kink, and pornographic film and literature have become inversions of their former selves. Whereas gay men once worshiped Hollywood divas for the strength and wisdom in their over-the-top performances, now those divas are lampooned. Whereas porn directors edited sex scenes such that the rhythm of the cuts replicated the sexual experience in the point of the view of the men having sex, now video-porn is structured with extended takes that create (rather than replicate) a distant, voyeuristic experience.These transformations are for Harris lamentations, but complexly so. For much of the book, it seems he's a kid of gay Andy Rooney wondering where the good, simple times of the 50s and 60s went. It's almost as though he's sad we've fought so hard to be assimilated into the mainstream. "[A]s oppression decreases," he writes, "[t]he unfortunate consequence will be that our need to produce art will begin to wane, and we will feel less inclined to assert ourselves as the proverbial tastemakers of our society" (7).It's a ridiculous claim, but one thing he's right about is that gay culture seems stuck (well, U.S. culture seems stuck; and that's really one of the problems with these essays: how much of porno's POV transformations can be seen as a result of increased gay liberation, and how much are really just a factor of the switch from film to video?) in a kind of perpetual adolescence. Harris twins the coming-out narrative with the coming-of-age narrative, and for him the surplus of such novels since 1980 has kept gay literature in a kind of thematic rut, or as he terms it, "an emotionally stagnant state of euphoria." "Homosexuals," he writes, "are not permanent intellectual convalescents," and while it's a good point to make, Harris doesn't try to locate any means of salvation for gay culture. Re-adopting the poses and practices of our pre-Stonewall culture of fear and exile isn't any kind of solution.

  1. Daniel Harris Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture book, this is one of the most wanted Daniel Harris author readers around the world.

975 Reply to “The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture”

  1. The central claim of this book is that since Stonewall, whatever it is that has formed and shaped gay culture has transformed Well, of course such a thing is inevitable when the people that make up a culture move from being hidden and shameful to being public and proud Harris s argument, though, is that such gay cultural artifacts as diva worship, camp, drag, kink, and pornographic film and literature have become inversions of their former selves Whereas gay men once worshiped Hollywood divas fo [...]


  2. I never thought I d hear gay people pining for the good old days when persecution was the status quo I get that the author feels that gay society was cooler and exclusive when we had to use secret handshakes and talk in secret codes, but there s something very beautiful about being able to be ourselves and be accepted for it Gay people no longer have to adopt lisps or other stereotypes in order to subtly advertise that they are gay in order to get dates We can now openly acknowledge that there [...]


  3. This book is really quite good at analysing the current subsets of gay culture in America and its own tendancy toward self subversion after for the most part Stonewall It s an ideal observation about the cliches in American gay culture and their relevance ostensibly understandable application Not only is it particularly well written but it s also quite catty no, really and laugh out loud funny at times.


  4. Greatly enjoyed the thought provoking aspects of many of these essays The final chapter threw me for a curve I do not prescribe to the belief that assimilation destroys autonomy I respect that many generalizations may be made for and about gay stereotypes but I find that no individual is one dimensional and I resent being reduced to a type of music, movie, or clothing preference just as I resent being reduced to my sexuality.





Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *