Diary of a Very Bad Year: Confessions of an Anonymous Hedge Fund Manager

Diary of a Very Bad Year Confessions of an Anonymous Hedge Fund Manager The First Book from n an Essential Chronicle of Our Financial Crisis HFM Where are you going to buy protection on the U S government s credit I mean if the U S defaults what bank is going to be ab

The First Book from n 1 an Essential Chronicle of Our Financial Crisis HFM Where are you going to buy protection on the U.S government s credit I mean, if the U.S defaults, what bank is going to be able to make good on that contract Who are you going to buy that contract from, the Martians n 1 When does this begin to feel like less of a cyclical thing, like The First Book from n 1 an Essential Chronicle of Our Financial Crisis HFM Where are you going to buy protection on the U.S government s credit I mean, if the U.S defaults, what bank is going to be able to make good on that contract Who are you going to buy that contract from, the Martians n 1 When does this begin to feel like less of a cyclical thing, like the weather, and of a permanent, end of the world kind of thing HFM When you see me selling apples out on the street, that s when you should go stock up on guns and ammunition.

  • ß Diary of a Very Bad Year: Confessions of an Anonymous Hedge Fund Manager ☆ Anonymous Hedge Fund Manager
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803 Reply to “Diary of a Very Bad Year: Confessions of an Anonymous Hedge Fund Manager”

  1. DIARY OF A REALLY BAD YEAR Jan 3 forgot to go to the gym today, was really busy, will definitely go tomorrow though.Mar 18 got promoted at work too bad that other guy got fired, YOLO.Apr 13 UGH NEED TO DO MY TAXES Isn t there a robot or something to do this for me I just want to watch SVU on Netflix.Apr 14 Damn, I should have done my taxes in February.May 6 So hungover I should do a juice cleanse.May 7 SO HUNGRY, I HATE KALE JUICE.May 8 caved and ate a whole carton of ice cream, will start clean [...]


  2. Excellent, readable introduction to the economic crisis of 2008 Present While it is quite educational, this book is hampered by the fact many of the terms of art of trading credit default swaps, collateralized debt obligations, etc are not defined at the outset Indeed, there is a minor flood of acronyms towards the beginning of the book This trend abates markedly as the book progresses This book is notable for three things 1 It is prima facie evidence that the market cannot regulate itself One o [...]


  3. These interviews give a nice summary of the 08 financial crisis, along with its causes and consequences Further, they do so in a way that is approachable to people without much background in finance That said, the book isn t just a crisis for dummies The anonymous hedge fund manager being interviewed in the book is generally self reflective and likable except for some occasional bitching about his taxes , and has some interesting comments on the virtues that one successful in finance.All that be [...]


  4. Surprisingly readable explanation of the economic forces that brought about the 2008 crisis the wave of foreclosures, taxpayer sponsored bailouts, and the return of almost all of the bankers involved to business as usual The obviously partisan opinion of the eponymous HFM is that no one was really to blame, and not much could have been done differently And the way he explains it so calmly, patiently and phlegmatically you just might end up agreeing with him It was weird to me, though, how sympat [...]


  5. the best chapter of this diary was the proletariat rage chapter or something like that that outlines what money dudes actually saw when they were confronted by one of madoff s salesman HFM is a clever reader of human nature, while the interviewer is amazingly blinded by his naivete it s sad to think about the damage this type of person can do, especially around election time.


  6. It is not acceptable that the six largest financial institutions in this country have assets of almost ten trillion dollars, and issue half of the mortgages and two thirds of the credit cards That is too much wealth and power in the hands of a few If Teddy Roosevelt were alive today he d tell us to break them up And he d be right These huge banks must be broken up Sen Bernie Sanders Our bank system has become unfortunately very concentrated Deconcentrating the banking system is going to be an im [...]


  7. One of the best and esoteric books on the financial crisis I have read It is a set of interviews over the critical years of the crisis with an anonymous hedge fund manager who reflects on what is going on It is very valuable for two reasons it is not a revisionist version of the crisis and he often makes predictions that turn out to be wrong by the next interview and it is from a great source one who is an insider who knows the space inside and out but is not so directly involved as to whitewash [...]


  8. Oh, baby This is why the Kindle is so great I read a review of this book in the New York Times, read reviews, downloaded it, and then carried my Kindle with me as I did everything until I finished reading it.This book is a series of interviews with an anonymous hedge fund manager, called HFM, during the financial crisis The interviewer who is not anonymous founded a hoity toity literary magazine and comes from the there are no dumb questions school of interviewing, which is a good thing conside [...]


  9. I don t think you can read this book and make sense of it if you don t work in Finance.But if I m wrong and you can, that would make it my favorite book on the crisis For the sake of keeping score, I rank this anonymous hedge fund manager above Joseph Stiglitz, Andrew Ross Sorkin, Robert Schiller, Alan Blinder, Neil Barofsky, Anatole Kaletsky, Simon Johnson, the lot of them To say nothing of Matt Taibi, Michael Lewis, Jeff Sachs, Hank Paulson, Paul Krugman and the various other guys who have an [...]


  10. An excellent story excellently written Basically a series of conversations between a financial reporter and as evidenced by the title an anonymous hedge fund manager From late 2008 through early 2010, the two talked about the markets, the products and the financial system as a whole They also discussed the talk surrounding those same subjects which was almost as interesting.I started reading about the financial markets for two reasons 1 I was, in a past incarnation, a stock broker and so have a [...]


  11. This is a great concept for a book, and I started it hoping to have a better grasp of what goes on at Wall Street and the financial crisis of 2008 In the end it wasn t the book s fault, but finance markets and taking advantage of normal Americans do not make for pleasant reading.I d recommend this book to friends who majored in finance in college, maybe work in finance, or who find this stuff interesting as a hobby or for people considering studying the subject But as someone who always found th [...]


  12. Great introductory reader into the Financial crisis I think it would be a much enjoyable read than some of the gigantic memoirs of the self interested players Paulson, Geithner, etc The perspective from a practitioner investing through the crisis and his mostly impartial views make this book stand out Also the dynamic of having a layperson with relatively little knowledge of finance helped keep the book clear to the average reader The jargon is almost always explained and most of the examples a [...]


  13. Extremely interesting book, both because the hedge fund manager interviewed was so thoughtful about the big picture implications of the financial crisis, and because the narrative structure was set up in real time, tracking what the hedge fund manager thought throughout the crisis rather than purely in retrospect I found the HFM as he is called in the book to be extremely perceptive, especially with regard to the financial sector and its inefficiencies and issues HFM s explanations of complex ph [...]


  14. Whew This was a short but intense read The amount of knowledge that spews forth effortlessly from the anonymous hedge fund manager interviewed here HFM is nothing short of astounding I m not sure I really understood half of it, but I did my best I don t think Keith Gessen did, either, and he makes no effort to pretend, which is pretty humorous HFM is dropping insane knowledge on how the sixty day corporate bond market works and all Gessen can manage is a stuttering half sentence which is probabl [...]


  15. I enjoyed the book as a fresh take on the financial crises It was interesting to see the world from HFMs eyes, albeit with the attached blinkers I did find his habit of using complicated words in the wrong context both annoying and revealing One example is HFM talks about being epistemologically arrogant in the context of thinking that ones particular time in history is different So after looking up what that meant I can only conclude that HFM does not know the real meaning of the word, which wa [...]


  16. Great read, and the most consistent with my experience of that time period Unlike other books on the topic, that overlay a narrative that simply was not there, this book captures the feel and reality of living through these events Hfm is an informed, thoughtful and in my opinion likable guy Also, his approach to understanding the world and way of thinking about it are a pretty good proxy for my own The interviewer was out of his depth as he admitted though occasionally surprisingly astute , and [...]


  17. Engaging, interesting, even suspenseful It s a series of interviews between a journalist and a hedge fund manager over the year and a half, from March 2008 Bear s collapse to May 2009, when the world had stopped ending These interviews are not written in hindsight They are written as these events are unfolding Bear s collapse and save, Lehman s collapse, AIG s bailout, and then once the finance sector is out of the water, the real economy begins to feel the effects in unemployment, foreclosures [...]


  18. This was a pretty quick read though to be honest, there were parts that I skimmed I was sort of checked out of the news during the financial crisis a few years back was in the grad school bubble , so this was pretty interesting in explaining a lot of went on It certainly made me glad I wasn t working in the financial sector at the time I m also curious maybe will ask my brother to know about the bias of HFM anonymous Hedge Fund Manager , whether what he says would be generally accepted within t [...]


  19. I was very surprised how much I enjoyed this book The interviewer a writer for a literary zine asks some very insightful questions and makes a point of getting the hedge fund manager he s interviewing to clarify a number of terms of art that would otherwise have muddied the waters pretty badly.HFM has some really insightful observations to make on the financial crisis exactly what happened, why, and what we should be doing to fix it.I definitely felt like I have a better sense of how the investm [...]


  20. A year after the fact, this book feels off, almost smug I enjoyed it but knew most of what was said The interviewer didn t press the hedge fund manager as much as I would have liked and he admits that he was ill informed about the subject That let HFM get away with some things, most glaringly to me the lack of reflection about the role hedge funds play in our economy He puts the 2007 9 blowup squarely on the shoulders of the banks, absolving funds of all responsibility.If you re going to read on [...]


  21. One of the better books I have read on the Subprime crisis and subsequent recession It helps to have some familiarity of the subject as the basic descriptions of terms like CDO s and CDS s are somewhat lacking However, I thought given the fact that the format is an interview, the book is exceptionally concise in its description of what happened and why things went so badly The book loses a little steam at the end, but it may be that the original serial form of the interviews was a stronger forma [...]


  22. The hedge fund manager is an economist in the purest sense of the word He speaks Econ and even though I am sure he has never read any of the papers I read in grad school, he knows them all he knows the main message and philosophy of them all His clarity of thought is remarkable, except when he goes on vacation, you can see the wheels in his brain not turning quite as fast Which is also a fascinating phenomenon A quick read if you know the crisis, a but technical if you don t.


  23. A fantastic, wide ranging look into the factors that led to the financial crisis, and why it developed the way it did The interview format and omnivorous subject allows the discussion to snap from the automated black box trading to the effects of emotion on risk taking Highly recommended, especially if you re familiar with the general course of events but want to learn about how it all fits together.


  24. Not only tedious but totally lacking an insight This wasn t so much a confessional as it was a record of casual conversations between some pretentious lit mag writer and a hedge fund manager Nothing but softball questions I walked away from this book learning nothing new about the financial crisis Nothing about how the system works, where it s flawed, or any dirty secrets, just the musings of some rich guy who walked away from this whole debacle relatively unscathed


  25. Interesting to read this right after completing Spiers Education of a Value Investor The HFM manages to drive home a lot of Spiers key points.I thought Gessen s interviewing was excellent and by the end I felt like I had a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the financial crisis I was bracing myself for some serious vilification of finance but I found the book to be very balanced.


  26. Just as the title says the book offers a first hand perspective of an interview with a HF manager during the start, middle, and close to the end of the worst part of the 2008 financial crisis.The greatest value of the book comes from the anecdotes embedded within the conversations between the HFM and interviewer, while it may not depict exact details and trading strategies not much practical use to the average reader anyway , it certainly portrayed how these managers think.


  27. Interesting meandering series of interviews between a na ve author and an astute hedge fund manager This would not be a good introduction to reading on the 08 09 financial crisis, but it does serve as a nice complement for readers with prior knowledge For those of us who ve been in the markets for awhile, it s a nice flashback to those crazy days when it felt like the world was about to end every time we woke up.


  28. The book consists of a series of interviews conducted with an anonymous hedge fund manager during 2007 2009 It s an easy reading offering good insight of how the fund manager perceive the events as they unveil one by one during the crisis The only drawback is that the interviewer is not an investment professional On the other hand, because of this, the interview becomes story telling by the HF manager with good flows and no interruption.


  29. Just because n 1 had a hand it bringing this book to light doesn t justify leaving it without a coherent narrative structure Interviews transcribed and published without any kind of editorial framing makes for a frustrating, though occasionally illuminating, read about the collapse of the hedge fund market.


  30. A series of transcribed interviews with a witty, intelligent, opinionated portfolio manager how many financiers quote NKVD chief Beria that furnish a valuable primary source for the history of the global financial crisis The book captures the feeling, familiar to many who experienced the financial panic, of staring in awe instead of making money.


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