Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance

Zip Worldly Goods A New History of the Renaissan

Zip Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance (Eventually... the point long ago made, the cataloguing of vanities got a bit wearying... Hence, the four stars. Also, I can't be sure that her central thesis is correct. Nonetheless, worth a couple of days of reading.)According to Jardine, in this fascinating book, the explosion of the arts in the 15th century (not only the fine arts - but prints, tapestries, gems, silver works, book-making, credit instruments... etc.) was essentially the result of an enormous acquisitive drive that appeared at this time of burgeoning wealth -- and that led (rather than followed from) to an expansion of trade, globalization, discovery, and empire... that was an attempt to satisfy this drive for a conspicuous consumption that announced that the men and cities involved had attained to pinnacles of worldly success and power. -- Hence, the extraordinary attention given in the paintings of that period to the clothes, cloths, tapestries, hats, turbans, damasks, silks, chalices, gems, embroideries, architecture, books, mirrors, bronzes, velvets, and so forth... in paintings commissioned by wealthy patrons from what were (at that time) essentially craftsmen (i.e., the painters of this period) -- all marks of a bursting forth of material (and of a quite materialistic) culture.Here is an example of what Jardine is getting at. Look at the extraordinarily detailed portrayal of the material culture contained in the work by Carlo CrivelliAnnciation with St. Emidius. 1486. National Gallery, London.The woman inside the window is the Virgin Mary. Outside, the angel Gabriel greets the Virgin while conversing with St. Emidius, the patron saint of Ascoli Piceno (Crevelli's hometown, which had commissioned the panel), who is holding a "meticulously detailed model of the town he guides. "The client discusses his ambitious town-planning project with his architect -- or so it appears."Here is a portrait of the Doge Leonardo Loredan (of Venice) celebrating the new threaded damask and velvet outfit that Loredan had introduced as the Doge's costume as part of a deliberate program of advertising Venice's new-found prominece as a center of high-quality silks.[image error]Vittore Carpaccio, Doge Leonardo Loredan.The men who commissioned or bought these paintings understood the language that these types of material expressions were speaking… the vocabulary and syntax of "worldly goods"…Here is an excerpt from Jardine's commentary on these two paintings:Robert Campin, Portrait of a Man. 1425-30. National Gallery, London[image error]Jan van Eyck, Portrait of a Man in a Turban. 1433. National Gallery, London"In Robert Campin's A Man and Jan van Eyck's Portrait of a Man in a Red Turban the sitters wear virtually identical costumes. The fur-lined robe of sober, heavy-duty cloth suggests a merchant. So too does the exotic turban, oth for its form and, especially, for its colour. The intense crimson dye 'in the grain' of the cloth is that achieved with Indian lac - a dye made from ground-up cochineal beetles, or from the bark of the trees within which the beetles lay their eggs. Such crimson cloth might be acquired in Venice or Amsterdam, but because the dye which produced its coveted colour had to be imported it was inevitably costly. The red turban advertised the individual's status as a cosmopolitan man of means with access to an international trading center as clearly as Doge Loredan's own distinctive headgear advertised his prominent civic role." (31f.)"Admiration -- the aesthetic sense of wonder with which the beholder gazes upon the work of art -- becomes here a mental representation in which sensual delight is strenuously linked with an appreciation of the market value of the goods and the urge to acquire. In the mid-fifteenth century the social rise of the merchant brought with it an aesthetic of expenditure -- a visual mode which gave delight through the intrinsic desirability of endlessly varied and exquisitely manufactured belongings, available for purchase. The eye of the onlooker responded with pleasurable longing to the fantasy of possession.... The art of Flanders like the art of Venice celebrated the triumph of worldly goods" (124).. Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance are Book In this provocative and wholly absorbing work, Lisa Jardine offers a radical interpretation of the Renaissance, arguing that the creation of culture during that time was inextricably tied to the creation of wealth that the expansion of commerce spurred the expansion of thought As Jardine boldly states, The seeds of our own exuberant multiculturalism and bravura consumeIn this provocative and wholly absorbing work, Lisa Jardine offers a radical interpretation of the Renaissance, arguing that the creation of culture during that time was inextricably tied to the creation of wealth that the expansion of commerce spurred the expansion of thought As Jardine boldly states, The seeds of our own exuberant multiculturalism and bravura consumerism were planted in the European Renaissance While Europe s royalty and merchants competed with each other to acquire works of art, vicious commercial battles were being fought over who should control the centers for trade around the globe Jardine encompasses Renaissance culture from its western borders in Christendom to its eastern reaches in the Islamic Ottoman Empire, bringing this opulent epoch to life in all its material splendor and competitive acquisitiveness A savvy, street smart history of the Renaissance Dan Cryer, Newsday Jardine s lively book is specific and down to earth A particularly fascinating section recalls how books suddenly ceased to be principally collector s items or aids to scholars and became the sixteenth century s Internet, dispensing fact and fancy to high and low The New Yorker. Lisa Anne Bronowski Jardine was a British historian of the early modern period From 1990 to 2011 she was Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies and Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters at Queen Mary, University of London Since 2008 she was Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority HFEA She was a Member of Council of the Royal Institution, but resigned from that post in September 2009 On 1 September 2012, She relocated with her research centre and its staff to University College London UCL to become the first director of its Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Humanities.. Good Kindle Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance This is a good, readable book on the renaissance, but I was disappointed with it, I had expected something more from Professor Jardine.The thesis that desire for worldly goods was a driving force in the renaissance didn't seem radical to me at the time of reading - surely that idea is implicit whenever patronage and commissioning are involved. On reflection my reaction was simply a product of my environment.I came to Worldly Goods after reading bits of Fernand Braudel. So the thesis of the desire to acquire material objects as a driving force of the Renaissance seemed not new but self-evident. Collecting beautiful objects and the increasing wealth of material things provided a useful means for demonstrating conspicuous consumption for the wealthy of this world. Consciously or unconsciously the spirit of Thorstein Veblen moves over the pages of this book. New frontiers in space and skill gave new opportunities to demonstrate wealth and success. On the other hand if you are coming to this book from a background of appreciating art then the approach of this book may strike you entirely differently. It has a focus on the artistic and artisan production of the Renaissance as being objects of desire. It has the Renaissance as the triumph of patronage, not so much as the appreciation of style and talent as ends in themselves but as a means of acquiring fabulous worldly goods.
Worldly Goods A New History of the Renaissance Jardine Sep , Worldly Goods looks at the Renaissance through its material traces and transactions, focusing on the immortal works of art, yes, but using them forensically as primary depictions of a burgeoning material culture that invariably gets lost in our customary focus on humanism and the great humanists. Worldly Goods Definition of Worldly Goods by Merriam Webster Definition of worldly goods things one owns possessions He sold all of his worldly goods Learn More about worldly goods Worldly Goods Ames, IA We are a non profit, fair trade Worldly Goods Ames, IA We are a non profit, fair trade store, operated by volunteers. Worldly Goods A New History of the Renaissance by Lisa Sep , In Scholar Lisa Jardine s book, Worldly Goods A New History of the Renaissance, she accomplishes just that, a new history Jardine guides her readers on a virtual tour through Renaissance Europe with a dominant Worldly Goods Aug , Directed by Phil Rosen With James Kirkwood, Merna Kennedy, Ferdinand Schumann Heink, Shannon Day A businessman who has devoted his whole life to obtaining money and power finds that he can t buy the one thing he craves love. Worldly goods definition and meaning Collins English Sep , worldly goods in British English w ldl dz or worldly possessions plural noun everything you own a man who had given up all his worldly goods They are Worldly goods definition of worldly goods by The Free Noun worldly goods all the property that someone possess he left all his worldly possessions to his daughter worldly belongings, worldly possessions Worldly goods definition of worldly goods by The Free Dictionary Worldly Goods Inc info worldlygoodsinc Copyright Worldly Goods Inc All rights reserved. Decorative Glass Bottles, Glass Balls, Candle Holders Worldly Goods Too is the retail side of Worldly Goods Inc a wholesale company in business for over years All our products are our own original designs The glass is handmade in our Mexican workshop by extremely talented artisans It is all recycled much of it Products Worldly Goods Inc Would you like to see pricing Yes No Please enter the password

  1. Lisa Anne Bronowski Jardine was a British historian of the early modern period From 1990 to 2011 she was Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies and Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters at Queen Mary, University of London Since 2008 she was Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority HFEA She was a Member of Council of the Royal Institution, but resigned from that post in September 2009 On 1 September 2012, She relocated with her research centre and its staff to University College London UCL to become the first director of its Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Humanities.

738 Reply to “Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance”

  1. This is a good, readable book on the renaissance, but I was disappointed with it, I had expected something from Professor Jardine.The thesis that desire for worldly goods was a driving force in the renaissance didn t seem radical to me at the time of reading surely that idea is implicit whenever patronage and commissioning are involved On reflection my reaction was simply a product of my environment.I came to Worldly Goods after reading bits of Fernand Braudel So the thesis of the desire to acq [...]


  2. Eventually the point long ago made, the cataloguing of vanities got a bit wearying Hence, the four stars Also, I can t be sure that her central thesis is correct Nonetheless, worth a couple of days of reading According to Jardine, in this fascinating book, the explosion of the arts in the 15th century not only the fine arts but prints, tapestries, gems, silver works, book making, credit instruments etc was essentially the result of an enormous acquisitive drive that appeared at this time of burg [...]


  3. An economic history written by a cultural specialist The book s thesis is hardly new and really doesn t hold up in the direction that Jardine takes it Plenty of very smart people have already pointed out that a capitalist economy existed in Europe well before the spread of humanism, and the economy was actually in a state of serious decline by the time the new culture started to take hold, so it s hard to argue that economics trumps culture in the case of the Renaissance Something than capitali [...]


  4. In Scholar Lisa Jardine s book, Worldly Goods A New History of the Renaissance, she accomplishes just that, a new history Jardine guides her readers on a virtual tour through Renaissance Europe with a dominant emphasis on mercantilism and consumerism Her main focus is the way the expansion of commerce fueled the expansion of thought and culture Jardine claims the ideas of material culture blossomed during the Renaissance She investigates the urge to own mentality that was born to the wealthy cla [...]


  5. In the end, I wasn t as impressed by this book as I had anticipated The author was highly recommended to me by a professor I respect However, Jardine s thesis is interesting and compelling, but she spends a long time and many, many, stories, pictures, and pages, fleshing out an idea that could have been communicated succinctly In short, Jardine argues that we should look for the roots of our modern consumer culture in the Renaissance This is the time period in which we see the modern beginnings [...]


  6. Jardine s book begins and ends in London s National Gallery, and her close readings of works of art including Holbein s The Ambassadors are a valuable contribution to Early Modern history In between, chapters call attention to the importance of material objects cloth, spices, precious metals and gems, and books She shows how maps and globes represent the expansion of knowledge but also the value of secrets, with key trade routes deliberately omitted from printed maps so that only the original ma [...]


  7. Jardine s view is that the growth of wealth and the desire of wealthy men to show off their wealth and possessions was a major cause of the flowering of art in the Renaissance She does not successfully prove this point in my opinion or even give many extra insights into the period.See my complete review here whatmeread.wordpress tag w


  8. Data rich a graduate education in a book Comparable to James Burke s alternative view of history titles, but much erudite Artwork seen as a key to the Renaissance passion for acquisition.


  9. A fascinating book that describes the Renaissance by means of the material objects it produced and the ways in which trade and commerce drove the scientific and intellectual advances of the period Includes descriptions of the book trade, early banking, voyages of discovery that changed trading relationships, the ways in which political power was bolstered by displays of conspicuous consumption, developments in clocks and scientific instruments.


  10. Originally posted on my blog here in September 2000.An interesting idea, Worldly Goods looks at the Renaissance through its attitude to possessions Two particular objects stand out in Jardine s analysis, the collection of carved gems belonging to a Gonzaga Cardinal, which eventually became stuck in the vaults of the Medici bank, as part of a complex system of pledges on loans and Holbein s painting The Ambassadors, discussed at some length in the epilogue and clearly bringing together many threa [...]


  11. I am rather indifferent when it comes to this particular book I had to read it for my Renaissance and Reformation class and it was a fairly easy read which is always nice But I imagine it won t be a book I look back on with fond memories It centers around the economics of the Renaissance time period Talks a lot about the beginning of banking and of course the infamous Medici s Mostly though it is about currency and what was monetarily valuable at this point in time There is an entire section on [...]


  12. A rather different take on the Renaissance, focusing on the flowering of financial institutions, and the accumulation of material goods, not only for their aesthetic value, but as investments While I wouldn t argue that this period wasn t seminal for the development of capitalist society, or that Burckhardt and his successors have said everything that there is to say, I found it a rather soulless reading of the Renaissance For me it was an exciting period of history because of the intellectual a [...]


  13. I like Jardine s books, this is my third, they are always nicely presented, lavishly illustrated, well written and so best in hardback I am not sure she does justice to the whole set of drivers to the Renaissance, and I am not sure she meant to Nevertheless, this book is about the commecial thrust, the emergance of printing, commerce, exploration and the new humanism and the new drive for aquisition, which she says is the foundation for modern capitalism, aquisitiveness and consumerism.The books [...]


  14. This was a bear of a book for me to get through, but I am glad I did On the one hand, it would be a better classroom book on the renaissance On the other, I liked the multitude of examples used throughout and the detailed explanation of the importance of each item held in high regard The problem I had was with keeping up with all of the names and titles of those who were spending and lending at the time.


  15. Closer to a 3.5 as it was well written My problem with it was that it was sort of a Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous Renaissance edition While that was interestsing, especially the book sharing portions, what frustrated me is the lack of discussion about the middle and working class From what little I ve found elsewhere, it seems like there was a corresponding jump in material wealth for those classes, and I m interested in what aided that, how that affected society, etc.


  16. Rad history of the renaissance b w o cultural consumption production As a badly informed socialist, this book kind of flipped my lid in re consumerism and its history I would dig up a particular passage about bravura consumerism and how the renaissance set the stage for the cultural history of Western civ, but i left the book on my bed and don t feel like googling that shit I totally recommend It s a sober but engrossing read, fantastic illustrations, dry humor, exceedingly wise.


  17. Extended and full of anecdotes The coverage of the development of bookmakers from artisans dependent on patrons was especially enlightening In some ways it reads like historical fiction where modern thoughts and motivations are applied to everything I would have been interested to understand about what parts of modern capitalist behaviour can t be ascribed to renaissance society.


  18. Very interesting take on Renaissance history and the driving power of international trade markets Jardine does a great job of examining the political and religious forces of the time the only thing that prevents her from getting the fourth star is that her prose can be repetitive and slightly lacking and her evidence can often end up depending on artistic sources As a whole worth a read.


  19. Not quite as good a read as Jardine s Ingenious Pursuits Building the Scientific Revolution, and a bit denser, but still an interesting read 3.5 stars.


  20. A truly captivating and rich reworking of the history of the renaissance with an acute emphasis on the idea of luxury goods and the acquisition of the same luxury goods being both material and works of great art and the role this impulse played in one of the great flowerings of human creativity.


  21. interesting read on the importance of affluence on our current understanding of literature and thinking Also has a number of interesting sections on cameo gem and treasure collections of famous banking families through history.


  22. Illustration heavy This book looks at the world from the time of the late Middle Ages through the late Renaissance through the lens of what was bought and sold The rise of personal libraries was of particular interest to me The lively prose holds one s attention throughout Lovely book.


  23. A very well done history of the Renaissance through the goods that were created and traded during the time I especially enjoyed reading about the Rise of the Book, as printing really took off in Europe.


  24. A convincing demonstration of how markets, trade and the desire to accumulate wealth were catalysts for the artistic, scientific and humanistic advances of the Renaissance First read it over ten years ago I did question the accuracy of some of the statements.


  25. Explores the influences between commerce, wealth accumulation, and artworks of the Renaissance I guess art has always been exploited as investments by the rich And here I thought that was an invention of our cynical, taste impaired modern age.


  26. I like the approach of this book looking at the Renaissance as a commercial phenomenon, and studying the various luxury goods that flooded Europe during the Renaissance But I don t think Jardine fully pulls it off the book leaves something to be desired.


  27. This books is fairly long and detailed, but I don t think you d have to be a hard core history geek to enjoy it While I wouldn t call it Nonfiction that Reads Like Fiction, it isn t textbook dry either.


  28. Quite an illuminating look into the rise of not only Western intellectual creative endeavors, but also modern consumerism through the expansion of world trade during the Italian Renaissance.




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