History at the Limit of World-History

History at the Limit of World History The past is not just as has been famously said another country with foreign customs it is a contested and colonized terrain Indigenous histories have been expropriated eclipsed sometimes even whol

The past is not just, as has been famously said, another country with foreign customs it is a contested and colonized terrain Indigenous histories have been expropriated, eclipsed, sometimes even wholly eradicated, in the service of imperialist aims buttressed by a distinctly Western philosophy of history Ranajit Guha, perhaps the most influential figure in postcolonialThe past is not just, as has been famously said, another country with foreign customs it is a contested and colonized terrain Indigenous histories have been expropriated, eclipsed, sometimes even wholly eradicated, in the service of imperialist aims buttressed by a distinctly Western philosophy of history Ranajit Guha, perhaps the most influential figure in postcolonial and subaltern studies at work today, offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World history That concept, he contends, reduces the course of human history to the amoral record of states and empires, great men and clashing civilizations It renders invisible the quotidian experience of ordinary people and casts off all that came before it into the nether existence known as Prehistory On the Indian subcontinent, Guha believes, this Western way of looking at the past was so successfully insinuated by British colonization that few today can see clearly its ongoing and pernicious influence He argues that to break out of this habit of mind and go beyond the Eurocentric and statist limit of World history historians should learn from literature to make their narratives doubly inclusive to extend them in scope not only to make room for the pasts of the so called peoples without history but to address the historicality of everyday life as well Only then, as Guha demonstrates through an examination of Rabin

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History at the Limit of World-History

  1. Ranajit Guha was a historian of South Asia who was greatly influential in the Subaltern Studies group, and was the editor of several of the group s early anthologies He migrated from India to the UK in 1959, and currently lives in Vienna, Austria.His Elementary Aspects of Peasant Insurgency in Colonial India is widely considered to be a classic Aside from this, his founding statement in the first volume of Subaltern Studies set the agenda for the Subaltern Studies group, defining the subaltern as the demographic difference between the total Indian population and all those whom we have described as the elite.

482 Reply to “History at the Limit of World-History”

  1. Ranajit Guha s work is quite stunning although a long way from easy going In this short book less than 100 pages , based on a series of lectures, he explores the terms and characteristics of the modern European notion of History as derived from work by Hegel by testing the limit of that history in colonial settings If that sounds demanding it is Still, he clearly lays out the Hegelian notion of World history as grounded in the European Renaissance notion of the nation as state and shows how this [...]


  2. A scathing attack to the Western standard of history predicated by Hegel Guha criticized the Hegelian philosophy of history that served to legitimize Western imperialist intention by determining the non Western world as historyless This all is done by taking the state as a prerequisite of ownership of history.Guha also made the effort to offer an alternative to the Hegelian approach by providing the thoughts of Rabindranath Tagore on the historicality of Indian literature.


  3. 1st half a satisfying stab at Hegel 2nd half a rich opening up of other ways of remembering one s past re telling stories thoroughly enjoyed it



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