Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal

PDF Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal Extremely funny and perceptive of human nature The scenes with Abdul He really is the most tiresome person I have ever met with the other Anglo Indians an

PDF Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal Extremely funny and perceptive of human nature. The scenes with Abdul ( 'He really is the most tiresome person I have ever met'), with the other Anglo-Indians, and certainly with His Majesty*, were hilarious. Others have commented on how not PC this is; in fact Ackerley's treatment of these characters is extremely human, and he is in love with absurdity, including his own. Further, the attitudes of Ackerley's character are nothing like the racism of the AngloIndian community, which he exposes and lampoons with gusto:'Do you like India?' Mrs. Bristow asked me.'Oh, yes. I think it's marvellous."'And what do you think of the people?''I like them very much, and think them most interesting.''Oo, aren't you a fibber! What was it you said the other day about "awful Anglo-Indian chatter"?''But I thought you were speaking of the Indians just now, not the Anglo-Indians.''The Indians! I never think of them.''Well, you said "the people," you know.''I meant us people, stupid!''I see. Well now, let's start again.' (p 79 (second edition, Chatto & Windus, 1952))Sometimes the book plodded along, but this is due to the careful observance of day-to-day life and the author's interest in the detail of Indian customs. I love the fact this is classed as travel fiction even though the name of the Princely State has been changed: "the State of Chhokrapur, if indeed it ever existed, has dissolved away in the new map of India" (Introduction). Maybe Chhatrapur?*(His Highness asks his secretary Ackerley:)'What must I say to God when I meet Him? What shall I say to Him for my sins?''I shouldn't mention the word,' I said. 'He'll be the best judge of your life. If you've got to say anything I should say, "You sent us forth into the world incomplete and therefore weak. With my own life, in these circumstances, and according to my own nature, I did what I could to secure happiness. But I did not even know what happiness was, or where to look for it, and it was whilst I was in search of it that I dare say I got a little muddled."' (p 255). Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal Viral Ebook In the 1920s, the young J.R Ackerley spent several months in India as the personal secretary to the maharajah of a small Indian principality In his journals, Ackerley recorded the Maharajah s fantastically eccentric habits and riddling conversations, and the odd shambling day to day life of his court Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedinglyIn the 1920s, the young J.R Ackerley spent several months in India as the personal secretary to the maharajah of a small Indian principality In his journals, Ackerley recorded the Maharajah s fantastically eccentric habits and riddling conversations, and the odd shambling day to day life of his court Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedingly strange place, and one of the masterpieces of twentieth century travel literature.About the Author J.R Ackerley 1896 1967 was for many years the literary editor of the BBC magazine The Listener A respected mentor to such younger writers as Christopher Isherwood and W.H Auden, he was also a longtime friend and literary associate of E.M Forster His works include three memoirs, Hindoo Holiday, My Dog Tulip, and My Father and Myself, and a novel, We Think the World of You.. Joe Randolph J R Ackerley was a British writer and editor Starting with the BBC the year after its founding in 1927, he was promoted to literary editor of The Listener, its weekly magazine, where he served for than two decades He published many emerging poets and writers who became influential in Great Britain He was openly gay, a rarity in his time when homosexuality was forbidden by law and socially ostracized.. The best Book Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal Extremely funny and perceptive of human nature. The scenes with Abdul ( 'He really is the most tiresome person I have ever met'), with the other Anglo-Indians, and certainly with His Majesty*, were hilarious. Others have commented on how not PC this is; in fact Ackerley's treatment of these characters is extremely human, and he is in love with absurdity, including his own. Further, the attitudes of Ackerley's character are nothing like the racism of the AngloIndian community, which he exposes and lampoons with gusto:'Do you like India?' Mrs. Bristow asked me.'Oh, yes. I think it's marvellous."'And what do you think of the people?''I like them very much, and think them most interesting.''Oo, aren't you a fibber! What was it you said the other day about "awful Anglo-Indian chatter"?''But I thought you were speaking of the Indians just now, not the Anglo-Indians.''The Indians! I never think of them.''Well, you said "the people," you know.''I meant us people, stupid!''I see. Well now, let's start again.' (p 79 (second edition, Chatto & Windus, 1952))Sometimes the book plodded along, but this is due to the careful observance of day-to-day life and the author's interest in the detail of Indian customs. I love the fact this is classed as travel fiction even though the name of the Princely State has been changed: "the State of Chhokrapur, if indeed it ever existed, has dissolved away in the new map of India" (Introduction). Maybe Chhatrapur?*(His Highness asks his secretary Ackerley:)'What must I say to God when I meet Him? What shall I say to Him for my sins?''I shouldn't mention the word,' I said. 'He'll be the best judge of your life. If you've got to say anything I should say, "You sent us forth into the world incomplete and therefore weak. With my own life, in these circumstances, and according to my own nature, I did what I could to secure happiness. But I did not even know what happiness was, or where to look for it, and it was whilst I was in search of it that I dare say I got a little muddled."' (p 255)
Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal New York Review Books A journal of Ackerley s stay in the Indian province of Chhatarpur during the s, Hindoo Holiday records and mocks the muddled morality and intellectual immaturity of both slothful Indian rulers and equally pampered British colonialists. Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal New York Review of Oct , In the s, the young J R Ackerley spent several months in India as the personal secretary to the maharajah of a small Indian principality In his journals, Ackerley recorded the Maharajah s fantastically eccentric habits and riddling conversations, and the odd shambling day to day life of his court Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedingly strange Modern Classics Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal Penguin Written in the form of diary entries, Hindoo Holiday records the period of time that a young Joe Ackerley spent as private secretary to the Maharaja of Chhatarpur renamed in the book The position was arranged by E M Forster who knew the Maharaja from Hindoo Holiday by J.R Ackerley Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedingl In his journals, Ackerley recorded the Maharajah s fantastically eccentric habits and riddling conversations, and the odd shambling day to day life of his court. Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal Penguin Written in the form of diary entries, Hindoo Holiday records the period of time that a young Joe Ackerley spent as private secretary to the Maharaja of Chhatarpur renamed in the book The position was arranged by E M Forster who knew the Maharaja from Hindoo Holiday on Apple Books Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedingly strange place, and one of the masterpieces of twentieth century travel literature GENRE Travel Adventure Hindoo holiday an Indian journal Book, WorldCat Summary In the s, the young J.R Ackerley spent several months in India as the personal secretary to the maharajah of a small Indian principality Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedingly strange place, and one of the masterpieces of th century travel literature. Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal book by J.R Ackerley Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal book by J.R Ackerley Buy a cheap copy of Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal book by J.R Ackerley In the s, the young J R Ackerley spent several months in India as the personal secretary to the maharajah of a small Indian principality. Hindoo holiday an Indian journal Book, WorldCat Hindoo holiday an Indian journal J R Ackerley Home WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help Search Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library Create lists, bibliographies and reviews or Search WorldCat Find items in libraries near you Hindoo Holiday An Indian Journal Penguin Modern Classics Mar , Hindoo Holiday is an intimate and very funny account of an exceedingly strange place, and one of the masterpieces of twentieth century travel literature About the Author J R Ackerley was born in Herne Hill, Kent, in and educated at Rossall School and Magdalene College, Cambridge.

  1. Joe Randolph J R Ackerley was a British writer and editor Starting with the BBC the year after its founding in 1927, he was promoted to literary editor of The Listener, its weekly magazine, where he served for than two decades He published many emerging poets and writers who became influential in Great Britain He was openly gay, a rarity in his time when homosexuality was forbidden by law and socially ostracized.

973 Reply to “Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal”

  1. Extremely funny and perceptive of human nature The scenes with Abdul He really is the most tiresome person I have ever met , with the other Anglo Indians, and certainly with His Majesty , were hilarious Others have commented on how not PC this is in fact Ackerley s treatment of these characters is extremely human, and he is in love with absurdity, including his own Further, the attitudes of Ackerley s character are nothing like the racism of the AngloIndian community, which he exposes and lampoo [...]


  2. With his tittering into his sleeve, his silly anxieties and his shortness, the Maharajah made me think of the Sultan in Disney s Aladdin And Ackerley himself became a kindly Jafar Much of the book is those two roaming around and devising ways of seducing numerous Aladdins.Discussing their ideal man The sun was setting in front is us in a blaze of pink and golden light His Highness waved a regretful hand towards it I want a friend like that, he said Another journey in the car Soon, however, we we [...]


  3. Well, I will start by saying, this review is going to be slightly briefer than the one I just wrote, and failed to save Thanks for that This book is the diarised recordings of the authors five months in the 1920s spent as the private secretary of the Maharajah of Chhatrapur The author goes some way to disguising the actual location, and goes so far as to suggest this is a work of fiction This journal then, which developed day by day out of almost complete ignorance, and for whose accuracy in fac [...]



  4. What an absolute charmer this journal is This is one of those books that I ve been meaning to read for a number of years, but for one reason or another had never got around to I m so happy I finally did Not at all what I expected I ve enjoyed a number of books covering the theme of East meets West culture clashes such as Orwell s brilliant Burmese Days, Ruth Jhabvala s Heat and Dust and Forster s A Passage to India and The Hill of Devi Still, I think it is Ackerley s whimsical reminiscence I lik [...]


  5. One of the most enjoyable books I have ever read Not much drama develops here Neither are there long winded philosophical musings on the nature of life and death or some such Instead, we get to look at the colonial India of 1920 s through the eyes of a young and naive British subject who s in India for the first time Despite being naive about some things, he s very perceptive about others His characterizations of different characters and their description make the book flow So wonderfully that y [...]


  6. The first thing to strike a modern reader is that curious spelling The double O, not U as is accepted The double O takes us to another time and place, to a view of India from not that long ago, but distant enough now to be another world Only the double O was not Ackerley s He spelt it Hindu The misspelling was down to the publisher, who felt that it gave the book another charm And he was right, for this journal of Ackerley s five months in India is the British social comedy transplanted to the I [...]


  7. A lovely book, quite funny, which Ackerley manages without becoming smug or belittling, as was the habit of many of the English in India at that time Set in the 1920s when Ackerley spent some months as the personal secretary to a rather eccentric Maharajah during the British Raj Most of Ackerley s time seems to be spent talking with people Marharajah Sahib sends for him frequently to discuss his many problems his health, his state projects, and his wish to buy his favorite boy from an acting tro [...]


  8. I do not need it, he cried, but I am worth it and therefore I must have it There is a golden mohur tree near the Guest House, and I sat on the verandah to day looking at its beautiful cascading orange flowers A mina bird perched on its branches, looking very inquisitorial and making a variety of inquisitorial noises The mina is a kind of starling, and is said to be as intelligent as the parrot in learning to talk Maybe it is and its harsh voice is no less unpleasant to listen to Bird noises are [...]


  9. Ackerley is smart and funny and an excellent observer of life around him I wanted to love this book I know a bit about Ackerley and I like the fact that he was an openly gay man traveling in the 1920s I love his voice and sharp observation and good humor Unfortunately, for me, the book became quite quickly tiresome because of the implied pedophilia that was presented as all in good fun I recognize that the shock value of the narrative at the time might have been titillating to British readers, b [...]


  10. This book should have been interesting an openly gay Englishman in the 1920 s visits an Indian nobleman and observes said nobleman s eccentric habits as well as records his own culture clash with the rest of India Sadly, it wasn t This was a pretty dull read for me I don t know if it was the writing style or the pacing, but it felt like like nothing was happing I honestly can t remember any significant events happening beyond the awkward exchanges between Ackerley and his doting tutor, Abdul The [...]


  11. Written in the form of diary entries, Hindoo Holiday records the period of time that a young Joe Ackerley spent as private secretary to the Maharaja of Chhatarpur renamed in the book The position was arranged by E M Forster who knew the Maharaja from when he was in India writing Passage to India.Parts of the book are very funny, especially his comments on British and Anglo Indian guests of the Maharaja whom he clearly dislikes.A beautiful young Brahmin boy named Narayan and a younger low caste b [...]


  12. Charming, but rather lightweight one of the cerise Penguin series It is a period piece, a diary set in 1920s India, in an imaginary Indian state reflecting the petty distinctions of caste, class and colour that are never far away from writings on India at this time Ackerley was highly regarded in his day, but the work does appear dated, and lacks any specific moments of excitement or note Rather a snob, he is quite candid about his admiration of handsome young Indian men, however Best read on a [...]


  13. There are few writers who are as entertaining as Ackerley And his comic portrait of a culture clash between the Maharajah and himself is not only hilarious but shows one of Ackerley s strengths portraying the British in India It seems like fiction, but Ackerley did spend 5 months working for the Maharajah, a character only Ackerley could have found Is this a travel book, a diary, a journal or a comedy of manners A book to savor or savour and re read So delicious


  14. An account of several months spent as the secretary of an Indian prince, in the 1920s I liked his My Father and Me some years ago so I picked this up His descriptions of the Prince and his fondness for beautiful young boys are amusing, and his wry observations of the people he meets are okay, but except for a few vivid descriptions of animals, it s not terribly interesting.


  15. Absolutely not the most PC book But fascinating, nonetheless An interesting look at an India and the colonialism that dominated it that still shows its face from time to time.


  16. One of his best books with some humor It may be considered a travel book, but it reads almost like fiction Enjoyable Can anyone suggest any non fiction books about the British Raj



  17. Some things to know about this JR Ackerley makes no pretense whatsoever about knowing much about Hindu culture, India, or the men and women he s profiling in this novel And that s sort of the fun.After his soldiering is done in 1918, JR Ackerley wants to get away so he signs up to be a kind of attache to a Maharajah in an un named or specifically pseudonymously named Chockripur What follows is 300 pages of absurdity in which the Maharajah attempts through various misadventures to gain power, e [...]


  18. This is a totally charming, funny little journal of a young Englishman s few months working for a majarajah in colonial India It s an account of his friendship with his nutty master, his handsome friends and the frightful English, as well as the beauty of the landscape and architecture.


  19. I found this in Vence by chance and wanted tor read about India It s very like Evelyn Waugh s Scoop Young good looking Englishman works as companion to the Maharajah Hilarious and insightful conversations with the Ango English don t become like the natives and the natives themselves His tutor constantly asking for favours regarding promotion and the choosing of gods young boys particularly stick in the mind We learn about the customs what s acceptable to eat and with whom, also constant differe [...]


  20. a classic travel book about an englishman who goes to be a sahib maharaja s tutor and possible lover in i think the 1930 s clear eyed aloof observations of a stranger in a strange land from NYRB Classics never a dud in the bunch.eliot weinberger introduces this and that s what led me to this thing in the first place THANKS eliot w.


  21. This is a lovely book, beautifully written, with great detail of the place and time the 1920s in India and colorful characters, some very likeable and others truly frustrating If you like the writing, also look for My Dog Tulip I have yet to read that one, but I saw the film version and it was super.


  22. I read the first 95 pages of this book, which was 95 pages too many Everything I heard about it led me to believe it would be very entertaining, so I kept reading hoping it would get funny, or at least interesting A couple of nights ago I was struggling through another page, when suddenly I was awakened by my own snoring


  23. I m in agreement with reviewer Kelly I wanted to enjoy this and find it charming, but I didn t One thing I did enjoy was Ackerly s openness to the Hindu culture Otherwise, this was just a wash for me I d rather read The Raj Quartet again for a mesmerizing look at colonial India.


  24. This was cool A princely Indian state in the 20 s The Maharajah and the author, It seems to me were gay and pretty out for the 20 s, I imagine Lots of great descriptions that I could totally picture Not stilted or dated, at all Classic If anyone wants to borrow


  25. A gem of a travel journal I was expecting dry, but got a mesmerising portrait of a lost era It was enlightening to learn about the Hindu religion and amusing how little control those titled have A must read


  26. This gem is quirky, funny and a must read although totally un p.c I love India and most things Indian, so I hope none of my Indian friends find out how much I love this book.


  27. Absolutely hilarious and a must read for anyone who wants to wash A Passage to India, out of his her hair Deeply problematically racist, sad to say.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *