A.D. 500: A Journey Through The Dark Isles Of Britain And Ireland

A D A Journey

A.D. 500: A Journey Through The Dark Isles Of Britain And Ireland Author Simon Young is Book Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information.Simon Young was awarded a starred First in Anglo Saxon, Norse and Celtic from Cambridge University, as well as the Chadwick Prize for Celtic studies Since then he has lived in Spain, Ireland and Italy The author of many academic articles, he has also written about the Dark Ages for History Today, the Spectator, and the Guardian.. From back cover From Tintagel and tin mining to saints and slave markets, from alcohol and King Arthur to boat burials and beavers here are the realities of life in the sixth century A.D.Based squarely on archaeological and historical evidence, this window on the mysterious world of the Dark Ages is written as a practical survival guide for the use of civilised GreekFrom back cover From Tintagel and tin mining to saints and slave markets, from alcohol and King Arthur to boat burials and beavers here are the realities of life in the sixth century A.D.Based squarely on archaeological and historical evidence, this window on the mysterious world of the Dark Ages is written as a practical survival guide for the use of civilised Greek visitors to the barbaric islands of Britain and Ireland.With the narrative of the Greeks providing a condescending and often hilarious running commentary on the barbarians , this is a vivid and original picture of life in the Dark Ages.. Bestseller Book A.D. 500: A Journey Through The Dark Isles Of Britain And Ireland Written like a travelogue, this is an interesting, fascinating and at times enchanting book.A lovely introduction to dark ages Britain.A must read.
A.D A Journey Through The Dark Isles Of Britain And Jan , A.D A Journey Through The Dark Isles Of Britain And Ireland by Simon Young . Rating details ratings reviews From back cover From Tintagel and tin mining to saints and slave markets, from alcohol and King Arthur to boat burials and beavers here are the realities of life in the sixth century A.D. World History AD AD Arthur s Victory Over Saxons The legendary Arthur won a battle against the Saxons at Mound Badon in Dorset, in Southern England This slowed the Saxon conquest of England AD Svealand The First Swedish State Svealand, the first Swedish state was founded around A.D The Goths inhabited the Southern part of the Swedish peninsula Much of what is known about early Sweden has Athanasian Creed A.D CARM Athanasian Creed A.D This creed is attributed to Athanasius, the fourth century bishop of Alexandria who was the strongest defender of the doctrines of the Trinity and the divinity of Christ It defines the doctrines of the Trinity and the nature of Christ in very concise language. What does A.D mean Quatr Study Guides A.D stands for Anno Domini, which is Latin for year of our Lord, and it means the number of years since the birth of Jesus Christ That was a little than years ago, so the date A.D means years after years ago, or a little than years ago As you can see on our BC AD timeline, the years before Jesus was born are BC Before Christ.

  1. Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information.Simon Young was awarded a starred First in Anglo Saxon, Norse and Celtic from Cambridge University, as well as the Chadwick Prize for Celtic studies Since then he has lived in Spain, Ireland and Italy The author of many academic articles, he has also written about the Dark Ages for History Today, the Spectator, and the Guardian.

475 Reply to “A.D. 500: A Journey Through The Dark Isles Of Britain And Ireland”


  1. In 410AD, the last of the Roman Legions left Britain to defend Rome from the increasing incursions of Barbarian tribes The Romans had been part of these isles for nearly four centuries, arriving around 43AD under Claudius Their legacy was great they had to an extent civilised most of Britain, bringing their culture and law, a road network and developing towns and trade Prior to the Roman arrival, Britain had belonged to the Britons, a tribal people, whom probably did not venture very far from th [...]


  2. An excellent read, much better than I expected from the cover notes Young takes us on a Cook s tour of the four nations of dark age Britain the Gaels, Celts, Picts and Saxons using the entertaining device of a faux travelogue written to inform a Byzantine explorer.His method really brings the dark age people to life and proves three things 1 intelligence wasn t invented in the 20th Century, 2 parochialism rules the UK, a region where hatred of one s neighbours seems to be baked into the DNA, 3 i [...]


  3. A good, if far from unique, idea of introducing the reader to a specific period of history through the guise of what would nowadays be called a travelogue, albeit it one written in the style of a Byzantine courtier.Nice at first but gets a bit bland and tiring after a while, especially with the somewhat circuitous route the book takes.One niggle would be that the downside to this format would be that anything interesting brought up by the fictional courtier is lacking in real world information t [...]


  4. The Byzantine travelog concept and resulting style could be a little grating, but on the whole, I found A.D 500 a readable account of the Dark Age British Isles and various peoples contained therein Young s copious notes were very open about his authorial choices and the historical archaeological basis for his speculation well sourced and explained I d certainly recommend it as lighthearted, digestible, general overview although it has the notes and index if you are so inclined.


  5. Loved this book What an interesting and fun way to read about history Using facts and other information, it s set up like a travel guide where to go, what to see, where to stay, type of thing Very unique Highly recommend


  6. Although a fictionalised account of a journey through 6th century Britain and Ireland this book is still an excellent historical book.It is adapted from the fictional travel log kept by a group of Greeks as they make their way through the Dark Isles of Britain and Ireland This fictional journey gives the reader a accessible insight into the culture of these lands during this period No specific year is given and this is deliberate, as it allows the author to choose people and events from through [...]


  7. Fascinating, thoroughly enjoyable tour through the Dark Isles of Britain and Ireland around about AD 500 The literary conceit of making the book the supposed guide written by a Byzantine geographer working to Imperial commission works very well, providing an amusing and bemused viewpoint on the oddities of the various groups fighting over the islands Full of interesting details it will take a while to forget just what was entailed in being crowned high king of Ireland and illuminated by the auth [...]


  8. The conceit is of a Byzantine librarian and researcher of the Dark Isles who is asked to write up a how to guide for a new expedition to the same He has a journal that came back to the palace from the last expedition though none of the adventurers survived as source material.And though he is horrified by some of the customs like sucking nipples to get protection, running around naked with body paint, or pagan like sacrifices , he s pretty sure he s equal to the task.It was an enjoyable read, and [...]


  9. Interesting, well researched overview of life in the British Isles in the 6th century, fictionalized as a guide for travelers from Byzantium Some of the main text is extrapolated beyond the evidence specifically available for the British Isles, but is not beyond the bounds of plausibility, is based on actual research e.g continental and or later practices , and is flagged as such in the endnotes.


  10. Reading this back to back with The Lost City of Z is kind of funny, because they re essentially about the same thing, half a world and 1,500 years removed from each other.If I had know it was written in a narrative, as it is, I probably wouldn t have picked it up the writing s a bit precious so far Hopefully it ll get better as it goes on


  11. very enjoyable book reminded me of an historical equivalent of bill bryson s science book a short history of nearly everything with the book much accessible than the average history book but yet just as informative and a lot fun


  12. Not what I expected at all, It s neither here nor there really Not historical in that it s mostly conjecture certain not as funny as it claims to be Best part is probably the notes by the author which give further reading on the period.


  13. is set up as a sort of fictional travel guide, written from the perspective of a Byzantine That makes it a perfect background for a campaign set during the first Anglo Saxon invasions I hope to have elaborate reviews of this book in the coming months.


  14. An interesting idea to posit a visit to 5th centry Britain and Ireland by a commission of Greeks reporting back to the Emporor in Constantinople The downside is the limited information available on the islands of that period, but informative and entertaining despite that.




  15. Diverting I m inclining away from the Big Anglo Saxon Invasion these days, and author also wants to use 19th century term Celt But full of amusing details.





  16. Loved the snarky humor on the part of the translator A good read if you like ancient history or historical fiction of the same type, otherwise it might be a bit boring.


  17. Abandoned this after discovering historical error early on I know it said it s a re imagining but getting something 500 yrs out of sync is a problem, as far as I m concerned.



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