The Ambassadors of Death

This book by LM Myles is marginally less enthralling than its two predecessors in the series However given the far smaller potential for analysis in The Ambassadors of Death when compared to Rose

This book by LM Myles is marginally less enthralling than its two predecessors in the series. However, given the far smaller potential for analysis in "The Ambassadors of Death" when compared to "Rose" or "The Massacre", I'm not certain this isn't a greater achievement.Either way, this book definitely deserves the four stars I have awarded it (and probably a little more).I was struck while reading this book by the idle thought that it really does pay to get in early. "Rose" is obviously a story that lends itself to examining the return of Doctor Who to the air (and the way it was done), but James Cooray Smith had the good fortune of being the first writer of "The Black Archive" to tackle a pure historical, and was able to pontificate on the nature of such stories and their pedigree in Doctor Who - despite "The Massacre" not being the first of its kind in any way.In a similar way, then, LM Myles here spends some time talking about the unique nature of Season Seven of Doctor Who and how it came about. In some ways, you could say that she is robbing the thunder of whatever writer gets the job of analyzing "Spearhead From Space" down the line (although truthfully, there is plenty left to tell in that area).On the other hand, it makes sense. "The Ambassadors of Death" is in some way the story that best 'represents' Season Seven without other factors perhaps being more worthy of discussion. "Spearhead From Space" was the introduction of Jon Pertwee as the Doctor, was the only story shot entirely on film, and did not involve Barry Letts - the producer of the rest of Jon Pertwee's time on the show."Doctor Who and the Silurians" had Letts joining partway into production, and in many ways is a compromise between his vision and that of Derrick Sherwin."Inferno", meanwhile, is an oddity in its structure - spending so much time in an alternative universe where events play out in a similar fashion to the usual version of Earth we see.So, if you had to choose one story in which discussion of Season Seven as a whole - and its nature - takes place, "Ambassadors" is actually the most natural choice as a target. Still, it is probably only the fact that this book comes before any covering the other stories that allows it to do this discussion in the first place.All that said, Season Seven as a whole is not the primary focus of this book. But the general makeup of the season is a popular topic throughout.So what does this book look like, compared to the others (so far)? Shorter chapters for one, covering more topics than the books on "Rose" or "The Massacre" did. Some of them, indeed, are so brief that they could just as well be left out for all they contribute (although I feel they could have easily been expanded). Myles has a lot to say about many areas of this serial, and wants to make certain she covers them all.After the usual prelude (including facts and figures, and a detailed synopsis) and an introduction that discusses Season Seven in general, we move to the first proper chapter: "Opening Moves". This is literally an examination of the way the story begins - including the title sequence, and the story title itself. Myles looks at the various types of story names, and why "Ambassadors" is one of the best. She then points out some interesting features about the specific choices made for the first episode's beginning."The Power of Three" is one of my favorites in this book. Here, Myles looks at the central triumvirate of Season Seven: the Doctor, the Brigadier, and Elizabeth Shaw. She compares the characters to other similar groupings, showing how they represent the so-called "Freudian trio".Myles does a terrific job looking at the characters and why they work as a storytelling engine - throughout the year as a whole, and in this serial in particular. She battles old fan-myths and explores the depths behind the three leads.All in all, it is a terrific, intelligent, and in-depth examination of a part of this season's success that is not often acknowledged. (As someone else has said before me, her understanding of what makes Lethbridge-Stewart work as a character bodes well for her upcoming novel featuring him.)Chapter 3 is "Holmes and Watson" and briefly looks at the way the Doctor's relationship with the Brigadier echoes that famous pairing. As she points out, the fact that "Ambassadors" plays out as a mystery really gives this aspect of their relationship a chance to shine.What she doesn't talk about here (probably because it is outside the scope of this book) is the way that the Brigadier will, in later years, come to be depicted as a buffoon of a sidekick - unintelligent and blundering, existing mainly to make the primary character look good. In exactly the way that most media depictions of Watson have played out.The next chapter looks at another duo - "Steed and Peel" - in regards to the Doctor and Miss Shaw. She celebrates the smart and cooperative pairing of the two and the way the scripts for "Ambassadors" have them play off each other, and work together. It is clear here that Myles has a great fondness for Liz Shaw's character, and laments the loss of such a figure in the year(s) to follow."Wealth, Security, and Knowledge" is the next chapter - mostly delving into the motivations behind the primary supporting characters in this serial. It's the kind of chapter that would be left out of most discussions of this type as being unimportant, but is actually vital to really analyze the story being told. Myles does a great job at unpacking the motivations behind the characters and the way they mirror one another.Following this is another important chapter, and one that stands out for me as the best: "Where Are All the Women?"Myles here looks at the presence and absence of women in Doctor Who of the time, and in this story particularly. She refuses (for good reason) to allow the matter to be brushed off with "it's of its time" as even if this were ever an excuse, that is certainly not the case here.This chapter is not merely an indictment of Doctor Who in the 70s, however. She allows some praise at least for the casting of women as non-speaking extras in scientific roles, which shows at least some understanding on the part of the people behind the series about what they ought to be doing.Some overlap happens between this chapter and the next one which focuses on U.N.I.T. The depiction of women within that organization is sadly lacking, and Myles examines that before going on to look at the way U.N.I.T. is depicted in this serial. It's a very short chapter that could do with some expansion (especially as I feel that "Ambassadors" is probably the first really successful presentation of U.N.I.T. as something that feels like a real and effective organization).There are, however, only so many words available.If you want a potted history of Britain's dalliance with space travel, "British Space Programmes, Real and Fictional" will be your cup of tea. More than anything else, it's a distillation of the real background behind the UK's attempt to be a space power, with a small mention of Doctor Who's presentation of the same at the end."Class Divisions" discusses a factor I had never considered in this story. Myles presents a great case for her view of how class defines the way "Ambassadors" plays out. The characters have well-defined social statuses which affect the way they behave and the way the audience perceives them. It's an intriguing look at something you may not have thought about before when watching this serial.A look at "The Ambassadors" themselves is next. We get to see a description of the way they are presented, as well as some thoughts about the imagery involved in depicting them and how its success affected other stories later.There is a contrast between the way most characters in the story treat the eponymous Ambassadors, and the way the Doctor and friends do. Myles looks at the "otherization" of the characters, as well as the one misstep on the story writers' part that contributes to that behavior."The Absent TARDIS" is barely a chapter, merely explaining that the TARDIS is... Well, you get the idea.Another short chapter follows, albeit an interesting one this time. "Colour Separation Overlay, and Other Special Effects" looks at the successes and failures of this serial's model work.Then, "Genre" explores the kind of story being told, and how in many ways this serial is more in the spy genre than science-fiction. (Contrasting one of the earlier books in this series which went to some lengths to explain otherwise, here Myles firmly declares the majority of Doctor Who to be "science fiction".)It is interesting (though hardly revelatory) to see the specific way that this story plays out like The Avengers (not Iron Man and the gang, but the aforementioned Steed and Peel) or The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Myles does a good job at breaking down the story structure to show how it functions as a typical spy mystery plot.Another micro-chapter called "A Crumb of Discontinuity" shows how the British Rocket Group both does and doesn't fit into Doctor Who continuity.The final concluding chapter is also very short, merely talking about how the author feared writing this book would ruin her love for the story, but that examining it in detail instead actually increased her enjoyment. She gives a few extra examples of beloved moments from the serial, before swiftly leaving us at the end of the book.Again, the analysis within this book does not quite come up to the standards set in the previous two books. The subject matter of every story, however, is not equal when it comes to close examination. Given "The Ambassadors of Death" as a focus, LM Myles did a better job than I can imagine anyone else doing in presenting a novella-length dissertation about a story that has Martians in British space suits zapping people to death.If you like Doctor Who at all, you're going to want to read this. I would say it marginally increased my enjoyment of "The Ambassadors of Death" - enough that I will be paying closer attention next time I rewatch.Bestseller The Ambassadors of Death Author L.M. Myles am Books I m sorry, Doctor, it s my moral duty The Ambassadors of Death 1970 is Doctor Who at its most adult A story with no true villains despite its action hero Doctor, it exposes the uglier side of human nature while offering an optimistic view of humanity s future It shows how fear alone can warp good intentions into horrifying situations, and that humanity is at its best I m sorry, Doctor, it s my moral duty The Ambassadors of Death 1970 is Doctor Who at its most adult A story with no true villains despite its action hero Doctor, it exposes the uglier side of human nature while offering an optimistic view of humanity s future It shows how fear alone can warp good intentions into horrifying situations, and that humanity is at its best when offering trust, compassion and kindness even in the face of mortal peril.LM Myles is a Hugo nominated editor, writer, critic and podcaster.. I m a Scottish writer, editor and geek, with a blog called Follow That Trebuchet cause medieval siege weaponry is awesome, most especially trebuchets.I co edited the Hugo Award nominated anthology Chicks Unravel Time with Deborah Stanish , and Companion Piece with Liz Barr , and I ve written for Doctor Who in prose and on audio, most recently the title story on the Big Finish release Breaking Bubbles and Other Stories.My writing s been published in Cranky Ladies of History, Uncanny Magazine, and Bernice Summerfield Present Danger, amongst others.You can also hear me say very sensible things about Doctor Who on the Verity podcast.. Popular Books The Ambassadors of Death Okay, possibly I am biased because Ambassadors is my favorite Season 7 episode and the author is a friend of mine – but WHATEVER, it is a great book, full of insightful analysis about characterization, plot, and where the story fits into the history of British space exploration. I hadn't considered how the Doctor, Liz, and the Brig fit the "Freudian trio" trope, but they do; just as I hadn't considered how British class divisions drive aspects of the plot (but they do). I love when fannish meta makes me see a serial through different eyes, and this book absolutely does that – and better, makes me interested in reading more of Obverse Books' series devoted to exploring different episodes in depth. (Next up is probably the one about "Dark Water"/"Death in Heaven.")
The Ambassadors Summary Britannica The Ambassadors, novel by Henry James, published in James considered it his best novel, and in the character of Lambert Strether, a middle aged New Englander confronted with the social and aesthetic attractions of a beguiling Paris, he brought to perfection his style of first person narrative Henry James The Ambassadors Ambassadors of the United States rowsAmbassadors of the United States are persons nominated as ambassadors by the The Ambassadors by Henry James One of Henry James s three final novels, all of which have sharply divided modern critics, The Ambassadors is the finely drawn portrait of a man s late awakening to the importance of morality that is founded not on the dictates of convention but on its value per se . The Ambassadors Hans Holbein the Younger Google Arts The Ambassadors , also from this period, depicts two visitors to the court of Henry VIII Christina of Denmark is a portrait of a potential wife for the king Holbein was born in Augsburg in The Ambassadors, Hans Holbein Analysis, Meaning was The Ambassadors, a life sized double portrait of the wealthy landowner Jean de Dinteville , ambassador of the King of France, and his friend Georges de Selve, Bishop of Lavaur The work is suffused with hidden meanings and symbolic features, in the best tradition of the Northern Renaissance, and the later Vanitas

  1. I m a Scottish writer, editor and geek, with a blog called Follow That Trebuchet cause medieval siege weaponry is awesome, most especially trebuchets.I co edited the Hugo Award nominated anthology Chicks Unravel Time with Deborah Stanish , and Companion Piece with Liz Barr , and I ve written for Doctor Who in prose and on audio, most recently the title story on the Big Finish release Breaking Bubbles and Other Stories.My writing s been published in Cranky Ladies of History, Uncanny Magazine, and Bernice Summerfield Present Danger, amongst others.You can also hear me say very sensible things about Doctor Who on the Verity podcast.

986 Reply to “The Ambassadors of Death”

  1. Okay, possibly I am biased because Ambassadors is my favorite Season 7 episode and the author is a friend of mine but WHATEVER, it is a great book, full of insightful analysis about characterization, plot, and where the story fits into the history of British space exploration I hadn t considered how the Doctor, Liz, and the Brig fit the Freudian trio trope, but they do just as I hadn t considered how British class divisions drive aspects of the plot but they do I love when fannish meta makes me [...]


  2. This book by LM Myles is marginally less enthralling than its two predecessors in the series However, given the far smaller potential for analysis in The Ambassadors of Death when compared to Rose or The Massacre , I m not certain this isn t a greater achievement.Either way, this book definitely deserves the four stars I have awarded it and probably a little .I was struck while reading this book by the idle thought that it really does pay to get in early Rose is obviously a story that lends itse [...]


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