Lexikon des deutschen Widerstandes

Zip Lexikon des deutschen Widerstandes This is a must read for anyone interested in the growth of the far right today as well as those interested in the notions of resistance and victims of the Naz

Zip Lexikon des deutschen Widerstandes This is a must read for anyone interested in the growth of the far right today, as well as those interested in the notions of resistance and 'victims' of the Nazi regime. The first victims were clearly Germans who opposed Nazism.Excellent chapters on continued attempts throughout the period to resist National Socialism by left wing organisations, within camps , underground or in exile. Fascinating to read about the collusion of organised religion.Firmly positions the only opposition to far right extremism in the hands if the left- who pre 1933 couldn't work together. It's a warning from history about the dangers of ego and lack of cooperation.. Lexikon des deutschen Widerstandes am Kindle None. Wolfgang Benz war Leiter des Zentrums f r Antisemitismusforschung der Technischen Universit t Berlin.. Bestseller Books Lexikon des deutschen Widerstandes This is one of the most important books in my library. The Encyclopedia of German Resistance is an essential work for anyone who wants to study the full scope of resistance to Nazi Germany. The text is divided into three parts: ten scholarly essays, summaries of each known resistance group or movement, and thumbnail sketches of individuals who were active in some aspect of resistance. Each section cross references with appropriate passages of the other two. The essay topics focus on resistance activities before 1933, of communists, social democrats, national conservatives, churches and Christians, the military, youth, the persecuted, those in exile, and women. Yet as comprehensive as this volume is, it’s poignance is underscored by the countless numbers of heroes and victims whose stories will never be documented.Although Nazi Germany produced some of the most despicable people in history, those who actively resisted are among the best of humanity. But even they had their fatal flaws, the most tragic being their inability—until it was too late—to empathize outside of their own circles of interest. For example, Pastor Martin Niemöller’s “First they came for the communists…” statement is misquoted. The truth, as he later acknowledged, was less poetic. According to him, “but we didn’t protest against it, because we lived for the church and the communists were, after all, no friends of the church, in fact the opposite, their declared enemies, and that’s why we remained silent.” The Catholic Church also remained silent after the Nürnberg laws of 1935 legalized discrimination of Jews. Even the many of the national conservatives and members of the military who instigated the July 20, 1944 assassination attempt tolerated years of oppression as they dreamed of dominating an oligarchical power structure. It was only the failures of the military and the increasing awareness of the Final Solution that motivated them to action.Many resistance activities were socially based and only later became political. The Edelweiss Pirates were a loosely knit group of youths in the Rheinland whose graffiti of anti-Hitler slogans spread into other parts of Germany. Thirteen of them, including three teenagers, were hanged in public in 1944. The Swing Youth risked their freedom and lives for their love of music and dance. Fred Josef tried to maintain his youth hiking group in Würzburg outside of approved Hitler Youth activities and paid with his life after he was tortured and sent to Auschwitz. Helmut Hübener, a Mormon who listened to BBC broadcasts and distributed flyers and became the youngest person ever executed at the Berlin Plötzensee prison. Emma Horion was detained by the Gestapo after she was found to have send liturgical utensils to priests on the front.One of the more interesting aspects was the resistance of those who were persecuted. Heinz Eschen organized secret lectures and discussions in Dachau to teach each of the groups of individuals about each other and build solidarity. When his work was discovered, he was brutally tortured and died in 1938. When criminals were sent to the camps—often after they had served their legal sentences—many became “longer arms” of the SS to make resistance even more difficult. Interned veterans of the Spanish Civil War often became revered leaders within the camps. Since the hospital wards were generally avoided by camp guards, they became often became the centers of what resistance was possible. In Dachau, a former prominent Czech politician was hidden in the rafters for three years until he died at the age of 85 shortly before the camp was liberated. In another camp, a healthy young man volunteered to care for patients with typhus without regard for his own health. That too was a selfless act of resistance.I’ve consulted this book many times over the years as a reference work in my reading of German resistance. Although it was published in 1994 and therefore does not include anything about the extensive scholarship that has taken place since then, it is still incredibly valuable and the bibliographies remain relevant and helpful. Donald Trump’s election caused me to put it on my bedside to read. The most important lesson I took away is that we have to check our narrow interests at the door and come together early and sustain resistance. That was, sadly, a revelation that came too late in Nazi Germany.

  1. Wolfgang Benz war Leiter des Zentrums f r Antisemitismusforschung der Technischen Universit t Berlin.

136 Reply to “Lexikon des deutschen Widerstandes”

  1. This is one of the most important books in my library The Encyclopedia of German Resistance is an essential work for anyone who wants to study the full scope of resistance to Nazi Germany The text is divided into three parts ten scholarly essays, summaries of each known resistance group or movement, and thumbnail sketches of individuals who were active in some aspect of resistance Each section cross references with appropriate passages of the other two The essay topics focus on resistance activi [...]


  2. This is a must read for anyone interested in the growth of the far right today, as well as those interested in the notions of resistance and victims of the Nazi regime The first victims were clearly Germans who opposed Nazism.Excellent chapters on continued attempts throughout the period to resist National Socialism by left wing organisations, within camps , underground or in exile Fascinating to read about the collusion of organised religion.Firmly positions the only opposition to far right ext [...]


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