Stories from the trenches

Stories from the trenches Viral Books One of the many titles on my Gutenberg WWI list this book was published in The sub title reads Humorous and lively doings of our boys Over There gathere

Stories from the trenches Viral Books One of the many titles on my Gutenberg WWI list, this book was published in 1918. The sub-title reads "Humorous and lively doings of our boys 'Over There' gathered from Authentic Sources". Those sources turned out to be newspapers which printed letters written home by soldiers, magazine articles, and sometimes official reports.The 25 offerings here were mainly about American soldiers both before and after the USA had officially gotten involved in the war, with short jokes in between to relieve the tension. I would not say that the main stories were humorous, and many of the jokes were not so clever either, but back then I suppose they would have been viewed much differently. (Although I did like the one about the wounded soldier who asked for a good-night kiss from the nurse in his ward and she flounced off with a parting shot about fetching the male orderly who did all the rough work.)I am not sure how the soldiers would have felt knowing that their personal letters home were being printed in public newspapers, and then collected into this volume. I imagine many of those letters left out a great deal, in order to protect their loved ones from the cold, hard, gruesome realities of life at the Front.But then at least one writer might have been thinking about publication when he sent a friend a letter about witnessing the death of German flying Ace Max Immelman. Case found the letter printed in the New York Tribune. The soldier described the event as a pre-arranged duel at 2pm one afternoon between Immelman and a certain Captain Ball, and claimed that the guns on both sides of the line were silent while everyone watched the dog-fight. He even added the bizarre touch of Ball dropping a wreath of flowers on the wreckage of the German's plane. I looked it up on Wiki, which I know is not always accurate either, but I think in this case it is a bit more reliable. There was no duel, there was not even any Captain Ball mentioned. Immelman had met up with some British planes at nearly ten p.m. one evening and shot one down, but a second plane's crew of McCubbin (pilot) and Waller (gunner) downed him before he could do any more damage. There was a piece about superstition in the trenches, with the Yanks introducing the rabbit's foot (the luck only works if the foot comes from the left hind leg of the rabbit, which explains the dud bunny feet I carried around as a youngster) and the real reason no one likes to be the third man to light a cigarette from one match. According to the French soldiers, it was not so much the assured death which would follow, it was the total pointlessness of that death. The third man never died with glory in battle but always as a result of a silly and preventable accident. One touching piece shared some of the reasons men had joined the army. These were collected by a clerk at a Y.M.C.A. office in France from Yanks who had just arrived and were getting sorted out. There were patriotic answers like “Because my country needs me”; adventure-seeking answers such as “to have a chance to ride on the train; I never had ridden”; and lifestyle answers “to get some clothes, a place to sleep and something to eat”. Even somewhat joking answers “it was a mistake; I didn’t know any better". But the most poignant of all was the final one, which ended the article: “Because mother was dead and I had no home.”Overall, this little book gives a glimpse into the world of the men at the trenches. Or at least as much of a glimpse as they chose to share. Naturally there are always horrors of war that those who experienced them will keep to themselves, only to be discussed and understood with others who were Over There. I was struck by how many of the letter writers truly believed that the world would be better afterwards and would never go through such trauma again. . None. Popular Books Stories from the trenches One of the many titles on my Gutenberg WWI list, this book was published in 1918. The sub-title reads "Humorous and lively doings of our boys 'Over There' gathered from Authentic Sources". Those sources turned out to be newspapers which printed letters written home by soldiers, magazine articles, and sometimes official reports.The 25 offerings here were mainly about American soldiers both before and after the USA had officially gotten involved in the war, with short jokes in between to relieve the tension. I would not say that the main stories were humorous, and many of the jokes were not so clever either, but back then I suppose they would have been viewed much differently. (Although I did like the one about the wounded soldier who asked for a good-night kiss from the nurse in his ward and she flounced off with a parting shot about fetching the male orderly who did all the rough work.)I am not sure how the soldiers would have felt knowing that their personal letters home were being printed in public newspapers, and then collected into this volume. I imagine many of those letters left out a great deal, in order to protect their loved ones from the cold, hard, gruesome realities of life at the Front.But then at least one writer might have been thinking about publication when he sent a friend a letter about witnessing the death of German flying Ace Max Immelman. Case found the letter printed in the New York Tribune. The soldier described the event as a pre-arranged duel at 2pm one afternoon between Immelman and a certain Captain Ball, and claimed that the guns on both sides of the line were silent while everyone watched the dog-fight. He even added the bizarre touch of Ball dropping a wreath of flowers on the wreckage of the German's plane. I looked it up on Wiki, which I know is not always accurate either, but I think in this case it is a bit more reliable. There was no duel, there was not even any Captain Ball mentioned. Immelman had met up with some British planes at nearly ten p.m. one evening and shot one down, but a second plane's crew of McCubbin (pilot) and Waller (gunner) downed him before he could do any more damage. There was a piece about superstition in the trenches, with the Yanks introducing the rabbit's foot (the luck only works if the foot comes from the left hind leg of the rabbit, which explains the dud bunny feet I carried around as a youngster) and the real reason no one likes to be the third man to light a cigarette from one match. According to the French soldiers, it was not so much the assured death which would follow, it was the total pointlessness of that death. The third man never died with glory in battle but always as a result of a silly and preventable accident. One touching piece shared some of the reasons men had joined the army. These were collected by a clerk at a Y.M.C.A. office in France from Yanks who had just arrived and were getting sorted out. There were patriotic answers like “Because my country needs me”; adventure-seeking answers such as “to have a chance to ride on the train; I never had ridden”; and lifestyle answers “to get some clothes, a place to sleep and something to eat”. Even somewhat joking answers “it was a mistake; I didn’t know any better". But the most poignant of all was the final one, which ended the article: “Because mother was dead and I had no home.”Overall, this little book gives a glimpse into the world of the men at the trenches. Or at least as much of a glimpse as they chose to share. Naturally there are always horrors of war that those who experienced them will keep to themselves, only to be discussed and understood with others who were Over There. I was struck by how many of the letter writers truly believed that the world would be better afterwards and would never go through such trauma again.
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  1. Carleton B. Case Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Stories from the trenches book, this is one of the most wanted Carleton B. Case author readers around the world.

853 Reply to “Stories from the trenches”

  1. One of the many titles on my Gutenberg WWI list, this book was published in 1918 The sub title reads Humorous and lively doings of our boys Over There gathered from Authentic Sources Those sources turned out to be newspapers which printed letters written home by soldiers, magazine articles, and sometimes official reports.The 25 offerings here were mainly about American soldiers both before and after the USA had officially gotten involved in the war, with short jokes in between to relieve the ten [...]


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