The Kings Depart: The Tragedy of Germany: Versailles and the German Revolution

The Kings Depart The Tragedy of Germany Versailles and the German Revolution The Kings Depart is the definitive story of a brief pivotal moment in human history when the course and shape of the twentieth century might have been altered Author Richard M Watt begins with the de

The Kings Depart is the definitive story of a brief, pivotal moment in human history when the course and shape of the twentieth century might have been altered Author Richard M Watt begins with the defeat of the Kaiser in 1918 and the convention of the Versailles conference, where Europe was to be remade This was the time when the victorious Allies might have imposed deThe Kings Depart is the definitive story of a brief, pivotal moment in human history when the course and shape of the twentieth century might have been altered Author Richard M Watt begins with the defeat of the Kaiser in 1918 and the convention of the Versailles conference, where Europe was to be remade This was the time when the victorious Allies might have imposed democracy on Europe by means of a peace with justice Watt s gripping narrative quickly becomes tragedy as diplomacy and politics fail at every turn He tells of victorious Allies too greedy and short sighted to impose equitable peace on a defeated Germany, of Woodrow Wilson s tortured betrayal of his own idealism, and of a German people caught up in the realities of revolution, anarchy, and violence waiting for the inevitable rise of a leader to exact vengeance on Europe a Fuhrer What began with the church bells of victory and hopes ends a year later in the first appearance of Adolf Hitler as a political power.

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The Kings Depart: The Tragedy of Germany: Versailles and the German Revolution

  1. January, 2015 ObituaryRichard Martin Watt, 84, of West Caldwell, NJ and Palm City, FL passed away on January 26th at Mountainside Hospital in Glen Ridge, NJ He is survived by his loving wife, Nancy Johnstone Watt, and five children Kimberly Watt Bealle, Linda Watt Doyle, David Watt, Jay Clure and Brittain Clure and their spouses, twelve grandchildren and his sister, Sarah Watt Webster of Edison, NJ.Born in LaGrange, IL, in 1930, Dick, as he was known by his friends, lived in Glen Ridge, NJ during his childhood and many years of his adulthood before moving his family to Mendham, NJ He graduated from Glen Ridge High School and Dartmouth College in 1952, and was commissioned an ensign in the United States Navy He was later promoted to lieutenant junior grade Following the Navy, and for the remainder of his 50 year career, Dick worked for Crossfield Products Corporation, a manufacturer of materials for the construction industry headquartered in Roselle Park, retiring as President and then serving as Chairman of the Board of Directors Dick authored several books on the subject of European history Dare Call It Treason, about the French army mutinies in World War I, The Kings Depart, about Germany between the wars, and Bitter Glory Poland and It s Fate, the history of a free Poland from 1918 to 1939, for which he was awarded the prestigious Waclaw Jedrzejewicz History Medal in 1996 by the Josef Pilsudski Institute of America His books were published in eight different languages and were reviewed favorably by The New York Times, Time magazine and others He also wrote over 100 book reviews for The Times, The London Review of Books, The Christian Science Monitor and others Before retiring to Florida, Dick was an active member of Christ Church in Glen Ridge and St John on the Mountain in Bernardsville, where he served on both Vestries for many years His interest in the disabled led to his involvement in the Dartmouth College Class of 1952 Friends of Alan Reich, which supports the National Organization on Disabilities which was founded by Alan Reich, a fellow classmate at Dartmouth College.A service in his memory will be held on Saturday, February 7th at 11 00 at St John on the Mountain Episcopal church in Bernardsville In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the National Organization on Disability, fbo the Alan Reich Legacy Fund, 77 Water Street, Suite 204, New York, NY 10005 or the Pilsudski Institute of America, 180 Second Avenue, New York, NY 10003.

668 Reply to “The Kings Depart: The Tragedy of Germany: Versailles and the German Revolution”

  1. Many useful insights into what made Germany after WWI such a fertile place for Hitler s message of hate and glory.


  2. Very well researched A broad view of what happened in Paris in 1918 19 when the victors shaped the world, indifferent to the fate of millions of starving Germans, while the small nations vied to attract the attention of the big ones to increase their territory The anatomy of missed opportunities that ended in WW II.Well written Reads like a novel I found myself almost screaming at the main characters.One of the best history books I ve ever read.


  3. This is an excellent, well researched, highly readable account of the treaty of Versailles and how it failed to produce a long lasting European peace at the cost of Wilson s idealism and the image of the French government A must read because it explains the formation of the early twentieth century and how politics and dipolmacy failed and resulted in the rise of Germany and Nazism Highly recommended.


  4. Some years seem to have events and significance packed into them than others The year or so from the Armistice ending combat in World War One to the signing of the Versailles Treaty shaped the rest of the century The Allies had thought they would shape events, but after the German surrender, revolution was the main dynamic in Europe From Lenin s takeover in Russia to the anarchy spreading through Eastern and Central Europe, Bolshevism seemed poised to fill the vacuum left by Germany s collapse. [...]


  5. Magnificent Watt manages to combine a novelist s eye for detail with a historian s desire to put all events into a larger context His character sketches of the various political personalities are a joy to read He also has a very firm command of the art of structuring chapters, always beginning with a point of intrigue before fleshing out the background Above all, The Kings Depart demonstrates the importance of individual personalities and apparently small, incidental events to history, from the [...]


  6. I was looking for a book that told the story of the end of WW1 from the German perspective and of the Revolution and Weimar Republic that follows Watt writes fluently and masterfully about the entire cast of historical characters from the diplomats at Versailles to the revolutionaries in Berlin, the socialists left holding the bag when the German Supreme Command capitulated and the rightist Freikorps putschists who tried handed the country back to Wilhelm II He gets the tone right acknowledging [...]


  7. Masterful, enlightening treatment of Germany from November, 1918 until the following summer During this period the Versailles Treaty was created as well as the Weimar Republic Watt gives a clear account as to why neither succeeded When the books ends with the death of Hindenburg and the installation of Hitler as Reichsfuehrer, it is the inevitable end to the tragedy that preceded it If there is a villain in the book aside from Hitler , it is Woodrow Wilson Watt is tart in his disparagement of Wi [...]



  8. I quite enjoyed reading this book, but I m hesitant to recommend it too strongly because of its dated point of view on German history It is extremely readable and compelling, intended for a general audience, but quite willing to go into depth on topics that are largely obscure and forgotten today But, serious historians will be disappointed by the lack of original research, the lack of a theoretical approach, and the default support of a Sonderweg viewpoint of German history Watt began this book [...]



  9. An oldie but still a goodie, this book is a definite addition to any WWI history buff s centennial Watt focuses, with an abundance of detail, on Germany between the Armistice and the Treaty of Versailles, and brief introductory table setting on the lead up to Germany seeking the Armistice, and a brief glance at the republican government after the treaty.First, we re shown just how much Ludendorff, the later originator, it seems, of the Dolchstoss claim, mentally and morally, in a sense collapsed [...]


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