New Stories from the South: The Year's Best, 2006

New Stories from the South The Year s Best We launch into our third decade by welcoming a guest editor to select and introduce each year s collection and who better to inaugurate the change than Allan Gurganus He has combed through hundreds of

We launch into our third decade by welcoming a guest editor to select and introduce each year s collection and who better to inaugurate the change than Allan Gurganus He has combed through hundreds of short stories written in 2005 to assemble a muscular array of talent, twenty stories ranging from low down, high octane farce to dark, erotic suspense.This year s volume comWe launch into our third decade by welcoming a guest editor to select and introduce each year s collection and who better to inaugurate the change than Allan Gurganus He has combed through hundreds of short stories written in 2005 to assemble a muscular array of talent, twenty stories ranging from low down, high octane farce to dark, erotic suspense.This year s volume combines seasoned writers like Tony Earley, Wendell Berry, and George Singleton with gifted newcomers, including Keith Lee Morris, Erin Brooks Worley and J D Chapman Their stories range from a communal love poem for a hunting dog, to a tale of a newly rich retiree trying to micromanage a Hollywood movie and losing his trophy wife to each new young screenwriter, to a harrowing work about a Virginia slave woman burned alive for witchcraft.As Gurganus writes in his introduction, The only region of the U.S ever to declare war on every other region of the nation won if not that great gray fib of secession, then most of the recuperating country s truest stories.

  • [PDF] New Stories from the South: The Year's Best, 2006 | by ☆ Allan Gurganus Kathy Pories
    362 Allan Gurganus Kathy Pories
New Stories from the South: The Year's Best, 2006

  1. Since 1989, Allan Gurganus s novels, stories and essays have become a singularly unified and living body of work Known for dark humor, erotic candor, pictorial clarity and folkloric sweep, his prose is widely translated Gurganus s stories, collected as Piccoli eroi , were just published to strong Italian reviews France s La Monde has called him a Mark Twain for our age, hilariously clear eyed, blessed with perfect pitch Fiction by Gurganus has inspired the greatest compliment of all memorization and re reading The number of new critical works, the theatrical and film treatments of his fiction, testify to its durable urgency Adaptations have won four Emmy Robert Wilson of The American Scholar has called Gurganus the rightful heir to Faulkner and Welty In a culture where branding seems all important, Gurganus has resisted any franchised repetition Equally adept at stories and novels or novellas, his tone and sense of form can differ widely On the page Gurganus continues to startle and grow.Of his previous work The Practical Heart , critic Michiko Kakutani wrote in the New York Times, Masterly and deeply affecting a testament to Mr Gurganus s ability to inhabit his characters inner lives and map their emotional histories The Atlantic called the same work, An entertaining, disturbing and inspiring book a dazzling maturation Of Local Souls , Wells Tower wrote It leaves the reader surfeited with gifts This is a book to be read for the minutely tuned music of Gurganus s language, its lithe and wicked wit, its luminosity of vision shining all the brighter for the heat of its compassion No living writer knows about how humans matter to each other These are tales to make us whole Gurganus s first published story Minor Heroism appeared in theNew Yorker when he was twenty six In 1974, this tale offered the first gay character that magazine had ever presented In 1989, after seven years composition, Gurganus presented the novel Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters This first book spent eight months on theNew York Times bestseller list it became the subject of a New Yorkercartoon and remains a clue on Jeopardy Names for 400 The novel has been translated into twelve languages and has sold over two million copies The CBS adaptation of the work, starring Donald Sutherland and Diane Lane and won and a Best Supporting Actress Emmy for Cecily Tyson as the freed slave, Castalia.Along with Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, Gurganus s works include White People, Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Pen Faulkner Finalist as well as the novel Plays Well With Others His last book was The Practical Heart Four Novellas Lambda Literary Award Gurganus s short fiction appears in the New Yorker, Harper sand other magazines A recent essay was seen in The New York Review of Books His stories have been honored by the O Henry Prize Stories, Best American Stories, and The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction Gurganus was a recent John Simon Guggenheim Fellow His novella Blessed Assurance A Moral Tale, from White People, has become part of the Harvard Business School s Ethics curriculum The work is discussed at length in Questions of Character Harvard Business School Press by Joseph L Badaracco.Born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina in 1947 to a teacher and businessman, Gurganus first trained as a painter, studying at the University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts His paintings and drawings are represented in private and public collections Gurganus has illustrated three limited editions of his fiction During a three year stint onboard the USS Yorktown during the Vietnam War, he turned to writing Gurganus subsequently graduated from Sarah Lawrence College where he d gone to work with Grace Paley At the Iowa Writers Workshop, his mentors were Stanley Elkin and John Cheever Mr Gur

980 Reply to “New Stories from the South: The Year's Best, 2006”

  1. I m generally leery about these best of collections the quality of the work is almost always spotty, and one frequently gets the sense that it wasn t so much the best of as the best way to pay back friends, to promote students, to curry favor The fact that such series not infrequently choose guest editors like Beck or the mega novelist screenwriter of the moment, rather than people whom we might reasonably expect to possess a certain amount of judgment with regard to contemporary writing, doesn [...]


  2. I listened to the audio book back and forth to several out of town meetings lately There were a few stories I did not really care for, but, for the most part, this is a really solid collection There were a few that made me laugh, a couple that brought tears to my eyes and many that made me see the South clear as a bell The narrators a different one for each story sounded authentic as well It was nice that a story set in Georgia had someone reading with a Georgia accent, while an Alabama story ha [...]


  3. I asked for short story collections last Christmas as I anticipated having little reading time and a short attention span with a baby due in January This collection has been a welcome change of pace from my reading about infant development and breastfeeding The editing author s dicussion of what are authentic Southern stories is terrific And there is a varied collection of voices telling the stories There have been a few I wished were full novels, but all save one have been satisfying as short s [...]


  4. I have been an avid reader of Southern fiction for a while and short stories are one of my favorite mediums These collections tend to showcase new and old authors, but always new stories The cultural evolution and stagnation of the South is quite evident based on my readings of this series over the past 15 years The tidy quality of the short story appeals to my ADD and desire to always read before sleep PlusI read them over and over.


  5. Eh This collection was OK I enjoyed Tastes Just Like Chicken the most For me, it came around full circle Short stories are very hard to write Most in this collection pumped up fast and had it goin , but then just abruptly stopped Left me scratchin my head.


  6. This collection of short stories was alright I wasn t terribly impressed by any of them I did like how the author gave a short description of the origin or impulse behind each story, because that s something I m always curious about.




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *