The Tetherballs of Bougainville

The Tetherballs of Bougainville am Ebook Before posting this would be review I went back to reread B nnie s much better and more postive review my advice is read that one If for some reason you hav

The Tetherballs of Bougainville am Ebook Before posting this would-be review, I went back to reread B0nnie's much better and more postive review; my advice is read that one. If for some reason you have nothing better to do, mine follows:Years, and years, and years, and years ago, friends of mine and I would drive from central Illinois where I went to college (Blackburn, if you’re interested) to ST. LOUIS (emphasis added, as it was a big city adventure, a trip, if you will [even if you won’t, as some serious tripping was going on—serious]) to see The Rocky Horror Picture Show, with its props, shouting, throwing things, etc. We made the drive numerous times, week after week, taking the country roads rather than the highway so that we could best indulge our profoundly illegal proclivities. Following a summer and fall of relatively nice weather, as happens most places, it started getting colder as we manned the admission lines, waiting to get in to the midnight shows. Once one of us had the brainstorm that by going to the actual evening feature we would be able to remain inside the theatre rather than braving the cold waiting for the later admission. Would have been a great idea had the feature not been a ten episode Three Stooges extravaganza which has saturated my interest to this day. Overkill. Big time.So does this matter? Of course not, but it does speak to the same sort of overkill I felt while reading The Tetherballs of Bougainville—a relentless absurdity that seemed as though would never end. There’s good reason why comedians don’t do Springsteen-like, four-hour concerts—too much of a good thing is not good, it’s overwhelming.I’ll let Leyner sum it up for himself:Through its furious incomprehensibility, The Tetherballs of Bougainville radiates a white light. It attains a white opacity toward which sloughed molecules of our own autobiographies float.Before going on to say:Leyner’s attention-deficit style of editing gives scant opportunity to ponder any of this.And that’s rather how I felt after reading this: too much brain matter sloughed off on a text that was clever, funny, interesting in form, but seemed endless to the point of tedium. Fast readers might very well love this one. I hope they do. Fans of writing over plot might love this one—I thought I was one of those readers. I come away stuck/struck only by the author’s cleverness, and it isn’t enough.Three stars, inching slightly toward four—for the homework the author did, for making me laugh, for being clever, demerits for not making me give a damn.. From his cult classic, I Smell Esther Williams, to his wildly popular and insightful column Wild Kingdom appearing in Esquire magazine every month, Mark Leyner has been giving us up close and personal encounters of the most hilarious kind for over a decade.Now, in his new novel The Tetherballs of Bougainville, Leyner shares with us, long last, the quintessential comingFrom his cult classic, I Smell Esther Williams, to his wildly popular and insightful column Wild Kingdom appearing in Esquire magazine every month, Mark Leyner has been giving us up close and personal encounters of the most hilarious kind for over a decade.Now, in his new novel The Tetherballs of Bougainville, Leyner shares with us, long last, the quintessential coming of age story that every writer, at some point, is compelled to tell In the novel we meet young Mark Leyner, 13 years old to be exact, as he waits in a New Jersey prison to witness his father s execution Adolescence is never easy, and it just so happens that this junior high schooler is on deadline to turn in a screenplay for which he has already been awarded the Vincent and Lenore DiGiacomo Oshimitsu Polymers America Award And, as it was for all of us during out teenage years, nothing seems to go as planned.Written as autobiography, screenplay and movie review, The Tetherballs of Bougainville twists three familiar narrative forms into an outlandishly compelling story Leyner s use of the media driven formats brilliantly reflects our secret, shameful and hilarious desire to experience our private lives as mass entertainment The Tetherballs of Bougainville skewers and celebrates American pop culture in the late twentieth century Leyner s version of our lives is so deeply funny because it is so painfully true.From the Hardcover edition.. Good Book The Tetherballs of Bougainville The Cover: The preface: "I want you to feel what it's like to be ten and, while the other kids are frolicking at summer camps, you're immured in the recesses of a mildewed hovel, subsisting on cigarettes and black coffee and spending twenty hours a day shooting a perverse misanthropic video version of Pippi Longstocking using tiny intricate marionettes made of cockroach carapaces, chicken bones, rat vertebrae pried from traps, discarded condoms, foil ketchup packets - whatever you can scavenge from the garbage-strewn halls". The plot: The 13 year old alter ego of Mark Leyner is in a prison to witness his father's execution. (Unfortunately) the father survives and now must live under the New Jersey State Discretionary Execution (NJSDE): he is free to go, but he might suddenly and without warning be executed by any means possible. He is given a pamphlet that explains the programme. Hey but the son has other more pressing problems than bungled executions. He must write a screenplay due the next day, for which he'll be awarded $250,000 each year for life. Instead of rushing off to the library before it closes, he has a drug and alcohol addled liaison with the female prison warden. This is the screenplay, and the second part of the book.The judgement: The Tetherballs of Bougainville is hysterical, encyclopaedic, smart, silly, dirty - avoid it if you have a low tolerance for a three and a half hour achingly beautiful cunnilingus scene, during which paperwork is caught up on, a phone call is made negotiating the end of a hostage crisis, snacks are had. Parts of this book (dare I say it?) are equal to anything in DFW: the preface; The NJSDE pamphlet; Len Gutman the mystical signage copywriter; the movie within review within screenplay within book; and the fact and cultural laden information overload. An annotated version would double or triple the scant 240 pages. That version is desperately needed! Take this simple sentence for example:"...kamikaze*-guzzling Thierry Mugler**-accoutered mother (smolderingly played by Nell Carter,*** who was absolutely riveting as Madame Verdurin**** in George Romero's***** terrifying remake of Proust's Remembrance of things Past******)". *A cocktail made of equal parts vodka, triple sec and lime juice**French fashion designer. He first collection for women was called Café de Paris. In 1977 Mugler applied the punk street look to his collection. During the 80's, he was part of a trend that depicted women as wicked Hollywood murderers, bondage retailers of illicit sex, or Mae West clones. ***Short, heavy-set comedic African-American actress and singer with a tragic personal history. Starred on the sitcom "Gimme a Break".****A character in Proust modeled after Madame Arman de Caillavet. Though one wonders why Leyner does not reference Oriane, Duchesse de Guermantes instead.*****Director and writer of horror films such as Night of the Living Dead******Seriously...does this need explaining?My criticism of Leyner is for what he didn't write: so many of these ideas could have been expanded upon. There's hardly any tetherball for one thing! Please, sir, I want some more! The excerpt: from the movie review (which runs for 50 pages):"Predictably, battered and suffocated bodies soon litter the floor, some pounded and literally flattened into two-dimensional scaloppini by the throng's trampling wingtips and Birkenstocks. This is far from the only instance of people being trampled to death in The Tetherballs of Bougainville. In fact, rarely do three characters congregate in this movie without one of them stumbling and dying under the feet of the other two. Whenever we're shown people emerging from a crowded elevator, we invariably discover, once that car has emptied out, the lifeless body of someone who's been inexplicably crushed to death by fellow passengers. I can understand the Ma Ling Stadium disaster scene in which drunken Bougainvillean tetherball hooligans supporting Wamp Kominika storm the stand filled with Wuwu- Bulolo Puliyasi supporters, and hundreds of people die in the ensuing stampede. But take the scene at the Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts in Brussels—a group on a museum tour is clustered in front of Pieter Brueghel's Fall of Icarus, and when, at the behest of their guide, they continue on to the next painting, we find, remaining at the Breughel—surprise, surprise—the crumpled, broken body of some hapless art maven who somehow fell and was pummeled to death by the shoes of his companions as they scurried off to Hans Memlinc's Martyrdom of St. Sebastian.The playlist: yes a playlist! with recommended artist and suggested changes (only one, actually) guaranteed by Leyner himself:The Glow of Love - http://youtu.be/YUxEGP1xOzQI Know It's Over - http://youtu.be/18GrFywPkXEOver You - http://youtu.be/M7GWvDPnuHYSoul Crusher - http://youtu.be/-VnWmKccx_8By You - http://youtu.be/4cr5H3eIG-8Target - http://youtu.be/R4Jv9xOsteEJust Like Honey - http://youtu.be/7EgB__YratEMacarthur Park - http://youtu.be/vJiUqWn-wZwMozart: K156 (134b) / Adagio - http://youtu.be/rAG8IxK-JDUDon't Go Breaking My Heart - http://youtu.be/Yee45L_O3_Y?t=32sSchoenberg Suite Piano opus 25 http://youtu.be/pLKVe8YikRoThe Best Is Yet To Come - http://youtu.be/NqmtCrgpeikMusic of the Night - http://youtu.be/LNrkY8X8qyEWest Side Story I feel *Shitty* - http://youtu.be/QKSN9cVPQhAInchworm - http://youtu.be/fXi3bjKowJUI Will Always Love You - http://youtu.be/14ivtcelIo0
Tetherball The Tetherballs of Bougainville by Mark Leyner The Tetherballs of Bougainville is about Mark Leyner, a young man going to Maplewood Junior High School in New Jersey while balancing success as a screenwriter The book opens with Mark playing The Tetherballs of Bougainville A Novel Leyner, Mark Sep , The Tehterballs of Bougainville while far from your standard fiction novel is still Mark Leyner s most accessable book and most plot driven The narrative is, as usual with Leyner, taut with The Tetherballs of Bougainville A Novel Vintage Aug , The Tetherballs of Bougainville is a soup of observation, weird juxtaposition, parody, and ribaldry that will leave some people stymied, but others positively delighted The satire and The Tetherballs of Bougainville A Novel Walmart Now, in his new novel The Tetherballs of Bougainville, Leyner shares with us, long last, the quintessential coming of age story that every writer, at some point, is compelled to tell In the novel we What is Tetherball with picture May , The object of tetherball is to wrap the entire length of rope around the pole in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction The final wrap must occur above the center line in order

  1. Mark Leyner is an American postmodernist author.Leyner employs an intense and unconventional style in his works of fiction His stories are generally humorous and absurd In The Tetherballs of Bougainville, Mark s father survives a lethal injection at the hands of the New Jersey penal system, and so is freed but must live the remainder of his life in fear of being executed, at New Jersey s discretion, in any situation and regardless of collateral damage They frequently incorporate elements of meta fiction In the same novel, an adolescent Mark produces a film adaptation of the story of his father s failed execution, although he reads a newspaper review of the movie to the prison s warden, and then dies, before even leaving the prison At the sentence level, Leyner uses sprawling imagery and an extravagant vocabulary, bordering on prose poetry.Leyner has also worked as a columnist for Esquire and George magazines, and as a writer for the MTV program Liquid Television He also co wrote and voiced a short lived series of audio fiction called Wiretap.Leyner is most famously critiqued in David Foster Wallace s essay E Unibus Pluram Television and U.S Fiction Despite this and appearances on David Letterman, Leyner remains a cult figure, though this may change as he switches over to the higher profile world of television development He has not written any novels for quite some time, presumably in order to devote time to this new medium Recently Leyner has collaborated with Dr Billy Goldberg on three humorous, though fact based, books on medicine.He is credited with co authoring the screenplay of War, Inc.

859 Reply to “The Tetherballs of Bougainville”

  1. Before posting this would be review, I went back to reread B0nnie s much better and postive review my advice is read that one If for some reason you have nothing better to do, mine follows Years, and years, and years, and years ago, friends of mine and I would drive from central Illinois where I went to college Blackburn, if you re interested to ST LOUIS emphasis added, as it was a big city adventure, a trip, if you will even if you won t, as some serious tripping was going on serious to see Th [...]


  2. The Cover The preface I want you to feel what it s like to be ten and, while the other kids are frolicking at summer camps, you re immured in the recesses of a mildewed hovel, subsisting on cigarettes and black coffee and spending twenty hours a day shooting a perverse misanthropic video version of Pippi Longstocking using tiny intricate marionettes made of cockroach carapaces, chicken bones, rat vertebrae pried from traps, discarded condoms, foil ketchup packets whatever you can scavenge from t [...]



  3. The Year Of Hyster ia ical Laughter also known as The Year Of Laughing Unto Death Death s Cackling Trumps All began quite well with this one More Leyner on the horizon, as the horizon draws inexorably closer.


  4. view spoiler You ve been reading vampire books and mommy porn but you ain t yet not read Mark Leyner s long cold off the presses The Tetherballs of Bougainville You, my friend have not been hip since 1997 And to make matters worse, you read Infinite Jest and disparage Jonathan Franzen for disparaging the most supreme William Gaddis but have yet still not ever yet licked the boots of Mark Leyner E fuckin gads Even Charlie Rose knows better hide spoiler


  5. OK I talk a lot of shit About everything.And a lot of times I make dubious recommendations to friends I am concerned that I have traded most of my credibility with late night boozy tirades about how good the second Danzig record is, etc.So hopefully someone out there will forgive me my trespasses, because this is the funniest book that I have ever read and everyone should give it a try.I am a big Mark Leyner fan I think that at this point that I have read all but one of his works It makes me sad [...]


  6. The truth is, I picked up this book for one strange reason it has a character named Len Gutman who is a writer How could I not read it Have you ever googled yourself Come on, be honest I do every once in a while and this book kept coming up because of the character with my name So I finally bought it a few weeks ago.Sad to say, I gave up about 1 3 of the way throughright after the character Len Gutman was first introduced and a few pages later when the strange story of his death came to an abrup [...]


  7. I wonder if I should be at all concerned for my sanity, because I was actually able to follow Leyner in this one pretty well Regardless, I loved the book I actually liked it better than The Sugar Frosted Nutsack I could just be learning how to read Leyner better, it this one seemed organic, free in the leaps and jumpsd no one makes leaps and jumps like Leyner Of course, I m not one of those people that thinks that a novelist s career is a linear process, nor do I think that my personal opinion [...]


  8. Things that are funnier than this laugh out loud , hilarious , out of control book an iron lung, pancreatic cancer, a burning orphanage, a mindfulness seminar, a dubbed episode of Coupling , the cartoons of the New Yorker, late period Ronnie Barker vehicle Clarence , visiting IKEA, the roundabouts of Coventry, and the overflow carparking facilities of Oxfordshire business parks The author is described by the publishers as a humourist I mean, honestly what was I thinking


  9. In short, this book is totally insane.Technically taking place during the course of a single afternoon, The Tetherballs of Bougainville is somehow a sprawling, chaotic, and hilarious journey through the verbose psycho ramblings of the 13 year old narrator.The spectacular first portion of the book starts with the botched execution of the main character s father who is then released into the New Jersey Discretionary Execution Program, where he could be instantly killed by the authorities at any ti [...]


  10. Many s the time I ve wished I could read this book again for the first time Imagery that s still rattling around in my head How many years ago was this published Many years ago Leyner is a twisted fuck He tears apart narrative cliches like a fox in the henhouse His writing is not for everyone If you ve read a page and don t like it, the rest of it is of the same He writes I m paraphrasing him so that, if the pages of his book papered a room, you could throw a dart anywhere and land on an intere [...]


  11. any a hole with a master of social work can put on a turban and start issuing fatwas about whom you can and whom you can t mail meat to, but it takes real balls to turn a brunette without a cranium into a blonde.


  12. Utterly preposterous Hand on heart one of the funniest things I ve ever read sections towards the end had me tearing up in snickering fits Wildly inventive plots within plots, all carried along with an absurd Pynchonesque sense of humour Highly recommended.


  13. I ve been trying to track down somebody I like as much as DFW, and Leyner gets thrown in with him occasionally Like I saw him, DFW, and Jonathan Franzen on an old Charlie Rose show In it, Leyner says he tries to really delight his reader, which he expands on in Tetherballs itself, in which the main character, Mark Leyner, is reading the film review he wrote of his own movie aptly named The Tetherballs of Bougainville that he never made, but only reviewed all of which is taking place in the scree [...]



  14. Why was I not informed of Mark Leyner Somehow I survived the 90s without once hearing his name Now that I ve finished Tetherballs in one sitting plane ride to Boston , I know that I will buy and read every single thing he s ever published Even the magazine bits This book is a miracle I assumed that references to pop culture simply couldn t work, they eventually become dated, and then you have the Norton editors adding footnotes all over your text, so that every other word your eye plummets to th [...]


  15. Well, that wast as weird and cryptic as I would ve thoughtd rather short The second half of THE TETHERBALLS OF BOUGAINVILLE is actually a screenplay so it goes by fast It s a novel that deconstruct pretty much every piece of pop culture it can get its hands on and tries to build a Ionescoesque absurd comedy with the immense wreckage on a universe that s filtered through our television screens.For the classical purists, it s about a kid witnessing his father s execution while struggling with his [...]


  16. Leyner is a literary hero of mine It seems like he can often accomplish in one sentence what it takes most writers to say in a few paragraphs His writing is extremely smart, funny, and satirical and I admit, I had to read this twice before I even began to understand it He is very much part of the MTV, self absorbed, masculine hyped, me generation, but somehow manages to pull it off with humor and derision LOVE this quirky, zany novel, and wish he would write fiction


  17. My father is not an evil man, he just can t do PCP socially This is the crowning achievement of American literature The main character is the author, at junior high age, trying to write a screenplay for a contest at his school Extremely funny and all over the place.


  18. This book is laugh out loud funny I can t even begin to summarize it, but I will simply concur with the reviewer that said, Tetherballs is like Rush on cocaine wearing leather chaps waving a scimitar I think that really does say it best.





  19. Okay, so the rundown is as follows This is a Mark Leyner book, and like the previous book I reviewed by him The Sugar Frosted Nutsack , it s a strange and difficult read for anyone not looking for off the wall absurdity While not as difficult a read as some of his other works, it s still not particularly easy This is, however, a good absurd memoir about adolescent life living with a father on the run in an insane world, and I must say that it s accessible than some and I have never read anythin [...]



  20. When I first read The Crying of Lot 49 I thought well at least an author has found a way to dazzle us with language enough that we don t immediately figure out we re dealing with a cry for attention a lot Of course then you read Portnoys Complaint and The Tetherballs of Bougainville and you realize this is common practice Most of the time there is something to be had in such novels that makes the reading worth while In Lot 49 there is an interesting plot and in Portnoy we learn much about mothe [...]


  21. If this were a short story, I would like it a lot Instead, it s just too ironic and clever for my tastes and I just can t bring myself to finish it Update Having skimmed through the book again and finished it, I still feel like this is too much post modern song and dance for me, but I think I was too hard on it I upped my rating from 2 to 3 stars Maybe I shouldn t have tried to read it in one shot It is post modern, after all, and jumps from cultural reference to academic reference and back aga [...]


  22. I like postmodernism In fact, most of my favorite writers are considered postmodernists So when I found out about tis Leyner guy who has been grouped with the likes of Pynchon, Franzen, Wallace, etc I had to check him out I was disappointed, to say the least Imagine all the worst aspects of the postmodern novel, the disjointedness, the flaunted erudition, the arbitrary shifts in frame, drain them to the dregs of their content, and you ve got The Tetherballs of Bougainville Every sentence is mast [...]


  23. Mark Leyner clearly has a brilliant mind and I plan to check out some of his work I read a review that stated this book needs to be read twice before you really get it, so maybe, I m the one that s deficient.This book, however clever and well written it may be and it is extremely so didn t do it for me It s pure style, and perhaps in 1997 when it was new, that style wouldn t have felt like a rehashing of post modern style tropes, many of which I ve seen used to interesting effect Remembering w [...]


  24. Ugh One third of the way through this book, and I, who have enjoyed Mark Leyner books in the past Et tu, Babe in particular , cannot go on Is Mark Leyner a very smart guy Can he summon up esoteric knowledge to throw in your face at every turn Yes But the result of the pyrotechnics in this outing is soulless I really enjoyed the quirky esoteric approach in Et tu, Babe, when I read it in my twenties I see a similar aesthetic going on here, but seriously, fully one third of the way through the book [...]


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