Lord of the Cranes: A Chinese Tale

Lord of the Cranes A Chinese Tale Viral Kindle My kids and I read this book as part of our history unit about ancient China We almost didn t get to it before it was due back at the library but I sn

Lord of the Cranes: A Chinese Tale Viral Kindle My kids and I read this book as part of our history unit about ancient China. We almost didn't get to it before it was due back at the library, but I snuck in a little reading after breakfast. My children loved this story. The illustrations are gorgeous and the story is a classic one along the lines of Baucis and Philemon about the rewards that come when we're generous. My children were enchanted by the idea of a man riding on the back of a crane in flight and painting a picture that came alive when people danced and clapped. It also gave us a chance to have a discussion about the reasons for and against being generous.I do have some reservations, though, about these tales that always connect tangible rewards with generosity. (The only story of generosity I've read that doesn't connect kindness with rewards is "Uncle Ry and the Moon," a Zen Buddhist tale retold by Jon Muth in his Zen Shorts.) In Lord of the Cranes, the innkeeper didn't feed the beggar because he was expecting a reward, but the tale wouldn't have been quite as interesting if the beggar just took the food and the innkeeper's life just kept on as it was (or if, at the end of the month, the innkeeper discovered that, because he'd given away so many free meals, he couldn't pay all of his bills and he lost his business and ended up a beggar himself). Because he got a reward for his kindness, I worry that children may end up with the idea that they should get something in return for being generous. Rather than feeling fulfilled and happy when they share their money or their time or their possessions, will they feel cheated if reality doesn't match all of the stories they've been told?How do we teach children to be generous even if there's no reward attached to it for us? Oh, wait...I guess that's my job as their mother to lead by example. I'd probably better get working on that.. Once upon a time Tian, the Lord of the Cranes, decided to leave his home, high in the clouds, and fly down to the city to test the people Dressed in rags, he went begging for alms, but only the innkeeper Wang, passed the test Tian rewarded Wang with a miraculous gift, a gift that brought fame and fortune to the innkeeper, and in return, Wang vowed to help the Lord of theOnce upon a time Tian, the Lord of the Cranes, decided to leave his home, high in the clouds, and fly down to the city to test the people Dressed in rags, he went begging for alms, but only the innkeeper Wang, passed the test Tian rewarded Wang with a miraculous gift, a gift that brought fame and fortune to the innkeeper, and in return, Wang vowed to help the Lord of the Cranes with his special mission The painter Jian Jiang Chen remembered this folktale from his childhood in China He heard it from an old man who told stories accompanied by a violin a common form of entertainment at that time when so few Chinese had televisions Retold here by his wife, Kerstin, it is a haunting and uplifting tale of virtue rewarded.. A viral Ebook Lord of the Cranes: A Chinese Tale My niece has some sort of inexplicable, life-long fascination with anything to do with China or the Chinese culture. Admitedly, her life has been short thus far, but that's beside the point. I knew she would appreciate this book simply because it's a Chinese story. She did like it, she appreciated the art, and the story itself.The story is more or less a do unto others story--it talks about the virtue of charity and kindness to those in need. It's a pretty book that tells a story that's been told in a million different ways. It's pretty, but nothing particularly special. What makes this book a four star book for me, though, is the part it played in a little piece of daily life today.When I picked my niece up from school today, this book was sitting in the seat of the car beside me, and we were going to be reading it in 15 or 20 minutes or so. While we were stopped at a light, a woman was on the sidewalk holding up a sign asking for help. The sign said she was diabetic, and that she needed money for food and medicine. I saw the woman, but did what is typical, and ignored her.In the back seat my niece said, "Amy, does that lady need money?" I said, "She says she does." My niece asked, "Why isn't anyone helping her?" I sighed and said, "I don't know, Baby." My little eight year old niece then got truly mad and said, "You know, people are so selfish these days! They always only think about themselves and never about helping others! It's always me-me-me!" She may as well have hit me right between the eyes with a hammer. Nothing can stop someone in their tracks faster than truth from the mouth of a child. I caught my breath, and then I saw Lord of the Cranes, in all of it's beautiful red cover-ness, sitting in the seat beside me. This stop light, this needy woman, this fabulous child, and this book all converged at this moment, and it was a really weirdly powerful moment! As that pretty red cover of Lord of the Cranes winked at me, I said, "You know what, Baby? You are absolutely right. We'll help her."So I don't know if Lord of the Cranes was more than an enjoyable story to my niece, but as I learned today, that's all it needed to be for her, because she already lives the lesson. But it was certainly more than that to her cynical, suspicious, hard-hearted auntie. My niece and Lord of the Cranes reminded me of an important and timeless lesson. A lesson that is especially vital and worthy of occasional reinforcement in this me-me-me world. Books and babies. They are great teachers.
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  1. Kerstin Chen Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Lord of the Cranes: A Chinese Tale book, this is one of the most wanted Kerstin Chen author readers around the world.

114 Reply to “Lord of the Cranes: A Chinese Tale”

  1. My kids and I read this book as part of our history unit about ancient China We almost didn t get to it before it was due back at the library, but I snuck in a little reading after breakfast My children loved this story The illustrations are gorgeous and the story is a classic one along the lines of Baucis and Philemon about the rewards that come when we re generous My children were enchanted by the idea of a man riding on the back of a crane in flight and painting a picture that came alive when [...]


  2. My niece has some sort of inexplicable, life long fascination with anything to do with China or the Chinese culture Admitedly, her life has been short thus far, but that s beside the point I knew she would appreciate this book simply because it s a Chinese story She did like it, she appreciated the art, and the story itself.The story is or less a do unto others story it talks about the virtue of charity and kindness to those in need It s a pretty book that tells a story that s been told in a mi [...]


  3. This book is about Tian, who is the Lord of the Cranes and lives in the mountains Tian decides to go down to the city to find out if people are being kind to each other This book is great I loved reading this Chinese tale and learning about the culture.I would use this book in my classroom to introduce my students to the Chinese culture I would also this book to teach my students to be kind to others.


  4. Lenore didn t love this book as much as I did, probably because it was advanced for her yet I thoroughly enjoyed the story about a god who became a beggar, so he could reward the innkeeper who cared for him I thought the nature of the reward a mural of cranes who danced for the innkeeper s guests was wonderful, combining my loves of nature and artists I hope we ll read it again, when Lenore is older.


  5. I know this is a child s book, and consists mostly of pictures, but I found this an absolutely enchanting tale Filled with plenty of morals, beautiful water colors, and an amazing story, this has to be one book that I am absolutely certain I will pass down to my own children In fact, I love using some of the mythology found in this book for thoughts of my own Great Chinese folktale.


  6. A rather bland and moralistic Chinese folktale in picture book form, which, with its inclusion of muddy, pasty paintings, has even squandered the chance to illuminate ancient Chinese culture through illustration It s an acceptable book not an exceptional one A historical note about sources, the significance of cranes and the meaning of TIAN in Chinese mythology would have been welcome.


  7. Loved the storyline of the Lord of the Cranes and how he visits a town and manages to find a man who will give without consideration of payment, just gives to be kind and generous Thought it was a charming little story with beautiful paintings of cranes.


  8. Lovely Chinese folk tale take about sharing with others and being kind I agree with a previous reviewer that a little bit of background info would have been nice, but I still enjoyed the story.


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