The Name of the Rose

Kindle The Name of the Rose Eco s writing is so infectious lively and likeable that I thought it

Kindle The Name of the Rose Eco's writing is so infectious, lively, and likeable that I thought it appropriate to pen my review in his style.1. In which I, as reader, feel used.Yes, I'm almost certain Eco wrote this thing for the sole purpose of informing us of how knowledgeable he is of the finer points of monastic orders, book trivia, and medieval philosophy. Knowing most would not put up with this crap for 500 pages, he wisely chose to interrupt his many digressions on poverty, heretics, whether or not Jesus laughed, Aristotle, architecture, etc, with an amateurish mystery plot. It's pedantry disguised as fiction. I've been used. 2. In which the pace sucks.Just when you thought it was getting interesting, just when the plot is getting meatier and it grabs your attention, here comes a dissertation or a long drawn description of doors, churches, parchments, beasts, characters that are totally irrelevant to the plot, and backstories that do nothing to shed light on the events. You must often wait a chapter or two to get back to the mystery that drove you to read this thing in the first place. Do yourself a favor and quit after he has solved his first "mystery" (page 25?).3. In which its heavy-handedness is offensive.Lurk around bookworms long enough and you're bound to find some pompous pseudo intellectual enraptured by the rich, textured, yet subtle literary clues so artfully crafted into this piece. Jorge De Burgos the blind monk is actually a nod to Jorge Luis Borges, the blind Argentinian writer? Whaaat? So clever...I'm sure the late Borges heard this, face-palmed, and then turned in his grave.4. In which the plot fails to deliver.Provided you made it as far as the end, all in hopes of finding a conclusion so stellar as to redeem the drudgery that preceded it, what one is most likely to find is disappointment. Most, by the time they get there, will already know who the culprit is, and given the setting and the tools the protagonists are carrying, what will happen in the final scene. Is it a fantastic twist? A conspiracy centuries in the making? No. Just lunatic ravings akin to the ones that drove Eco to romanticize about love, lust, knowledge, etc.... The Name of the Rose is a Book The year is 1327 Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon all sharpened to a glistThe year is 1327 Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon all sharpened to a glistening edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where the most interesting things happen at night.. Umberto Eco was an Italian writer of fiction, essays, academic texts, and children s books, and certainly one of the finest authors of the twentieth century A professor of semiotics at the University of Bologna, Eco s brilliant fiction is known for its playful use of language and symbols, its astonishing array of allusions and references, and clever use of puzzles and narrative inventions His perceptive essays on modern culture are filled with a delightful sense of humor and irony, and his ideas on semiotics, interpretation, and aesthetics have established his reputation as one of academia s foremost thinkers.. Popular Book The Name of the Rose Eco's writing is so infectious, lively, and likeable that I thought it appropriate to pen my review in his style.1. In which I, as reader, feel used.Yes, I'm almost certain Eco wrote this thing for the sole purpose of informing us of how knowledgeable he is of the finer points of monastic orders, book trivia, and medieval philosophy. Knowing most would not put up with this crap for 500 pages, he wisely chose to interrupt his many digressions on poverty, heretics, whether or not Jesus laughed, Aristotle, architecture, etc, with an amateurish mystery plot. It's pedantry disguised as fiction. I've been used. 2. In which the pace sucks.Just when you thought it was getting interesting, just when the plot is getting meatier and it grabs your attention, here comes a dissertation or a long drawn description of doors, churches, parchments, beasts, characters that are totally irrelevant to the plot, and backstories that do nothing to shed light on the events. You must often wait a chapter or two to get back to the mystery that drove you to read this thing in the first place. Do yourself a favor and quit after he has solved his first "mystery" (page 25?).3. In which its heavy-handedness is offensive.Lurk around bookworms long enough and you're bound to find some pompous pseudo intellectual enraptured by the rich, textured, yet subtle literary clues so artfully crafted into this piece. Jorge De Burgos the blind monk is actually a nod to Jorge Luis Borges, the blind Argentinian writer? Whaaat? So clever...I'm sure the late Borges heard this, face-palmed, and then turned in his grave.4. In which the plot fails to deliver.Provided you made it as far as the end, all in hopes of finding a conclusion so stellar as to redeem the drudgery that preceded it, what one is most likely to find is disappointment. Most, by the time they get there, will already know who the culprit is, and given the setting and the tools the protagonists are carrying, what will happen in the final scene. Is it a fantastic twist? A conspiracy centuries in the making? No. Just lunatic ravings akin to the ones that drove Eco to romanticize about love, lust, knowledge, etc...
By The Name Of Definition of By The Name Of by Merriam By the name of definition is used to indicate the name that is used for someone or something How to use by the name of in a sentence. In the name of Idioms by The Free Dictionary Definition of in the name of in the Idioms Dictionary in the name of phrase What does in the name of expression mean Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary. In the name of definition and meaning Collins English Sep , in the name of in American English in appeal or reference to by the authority of as the representative of as belonging to See full dictionary entry for name Webster s New World The Meaning and History of First Names Behind the Name May , This name was borne by Lij Tafari Makonnen , also known as Haile Selassie, the last emperor of Ethiopia Rastafarians Ras Tafari meaning king Tafari revere him as the earthly incarnation of God. In the name of definition of in the name of by The Free Define in the name of in the name of synonyms, in the name of pronunciation, in the name of translation, English dictionary definition of in the name of n a A word or words by which an entity is designated and distinguished from others b A word or group of In the name of Synonyms, In the name of Antonyms Another word for in the name of Find ways to say in the name of, along with related words, antonyms and example phrases at Thesaurus, the world s most trusted free thesaurus. List of tropical storm and hurricane names for May , Names on the list alternate between male and female Names are reused every six years unless a particular storm is deemed to have been particularly destructive or deadly Names The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss Mar , The Name of The Wind is a book that took me months to finish, but not because I didn t enjoy it I was just saving every page and svoring every line like an addicted person saves their last dose The characters, even the smallest ones, have a way of making their way into your heart that you can t help but fall for every sin

  1. Umberto Eco was an Italian writer of fiction, essays, academic texts, and children s books, and certainly one of the finest authors of the twentieth century A professor of semiotics at the University of Bologna, Eco s brilliant fiction is known for its playful use of language and symbols, its astonishing array of allusions and references, and clever use of puzzles and narrative inventions His perceptive essays on modern culture are filled with a delightful sense of humor and irony, and his ideas on semiotics, interpretation, and aesthetics have established his reputation as one of academia s foremost thinkers.

859 Reply to “The Name of the Rose”

  1. Eco s writing is so infectious, lively, and likeable that I thought it appropriate to pen my review in his style.1 In which I, as reader, feel used.Yes, I m almost certain Eco wrote this thing for the sole purpose of informing us of how knowledgeable he is of the finer points of monastic orders, book trivia, and medieval philosophy Knowing most would not put up with this crap for 500 pages, he wisely chose to interrupt his many digressions on poverty, heretics, whether or not Jesus laughed, Aris [...]


  2. , , 1980 VS 2008 Hypatia 1853 1853 , 2008 , , , , , , Song of the Songs , , , , , 1980 VS The Da Vici Code 2003 2003 , , , , , , 1980 VS Angels and Demons 2000 , , , , , 20 , 2 , , , , 11 2014 suchasmallaffairs 10 2014 18 2014



  3. Go ahead, throw your tomatoes at me I know that in general this book is loved Many count it amongst their favorites I found it very dull and very boring I had an extremely hard time staying interested in the story, which is weird for me and mystery suspense stories Never have I fought so hard to finish a book in general, I do not DNF.So, if you couldn t stand it either, let me know that I am not alone.For those that loved it and are ready to launch rotten produce at me


  4. This is one of those rare near perfect books that crosses through many genres and could be universally acclaimed There are dozens of great reviews on here already, but this book struck me as so profound that I felt I needed to briefly put down my own thoughts I could not bring myself to put this down and it was always a battle to not skip work and continue reading in the parking lot after lunch break Eco crafts a novel that could be labeled as historical fiction, mystery, theology and philosophy [...]


  5. Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcenter I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP it is not being reprinted here illegally The CCLaP 100 In which I read a hundred so called classics and then write reports on whether or not I think they deserve the labelBook 7 The Name of the Rose, by Umberto EcoThe story in a nutshell In one of the fascinating stories of how a novelist was first drawn to his profession, scholar Umberto Eco was act [...]


  6. The Name of the Rose is not a book to be picked up lightly with the expectation that you, the reader, are about to embark on a traditional work of historical fiction Umberto Eco expects much from the reader of this book Almost immediately the unsuspecting reader will find himself dropped into the midst of the High Middle Ages, a society completely foreign for the majority of modern readers.In historical context, the story occurs during the time the Papacy had moved from its traditional location [...]


  7. If I had to spend a year on a desert island and was only allowed to take one book, this would be it At the time of its publication, one reviewer described The Name of the Rose as a book about everything At first glance, it may seem to be a book largely about obscure Fourteenth Century religious controversies, heresies and sects, with a murder mystery mixed in But this is a book that rewards repeat readings I ve just finished it for the seventh time , and the heart of the novel is in its expositi [...]


  8. Forget Christopher Hitchens Away with that Richard Doggins guy For a truly penetrating look at religion and atheism, Umberto Eco, he da man The Name of the Rose is a profoundly nihilistic book It is ostensibly a book about a murder mystery A man, a monk rather, Brother William, arrives with his assistant, Adso, at an abbey high in the Italian Alps A murder has been committed, and Brother William will apply reason and logic a Sherlock avant la lettre to deduce the murderer Or does he He does inde [...]


  9. This is one humdinger of a book medieval history, Gothic noir and classic whodunit rolled into one It s very slow but taking your time to read it slowly provides rich dividends, IMO This is a book to be savoured.Brother William of Baskerville the name, as well as his appearance marks him as a sort of medieval Sherlock Holmes is the detective par excellence, and Adso of Melk is the perfect Watson The story unfolds in the fashion of the classic mystery The secret, when it is revealed, is sufficien [...]


  10. What a didactic, tedious, prolix piece of trash Eco writes whole paragraphs in Latin and then leaves them untranslated, because he s such an awesome polyglot that chicks want to do him Readers are also expected to know Dutch Eco likes to hear himself talk, too Want to hear pedantic 14th century theological arguments that stretch on for pages and have nothing to do with the plot You ve got it Want a lame Dan Brown mystery, with the same stilted dialogue, but embellished with entire chapters of th [...]


  11. I had wanted to read The Name of the Rose for a long time, mostly because I enjoy both fiction and non fiction about the Middle Ages, and also because of its importance as a piece of modern Italian literature Although I liked it for the most part, I have to admit that it disappointed me in many ways As a mystery novel, I was expecting it to be a fast paced page turner, whereas in reality The Name of the Rose is very slow and ponderous I appreciate the attention to detail and the minute and accur [...]


  12. We shall not understand the history of men and of other times unless we ourselves are alive to the requirements which that history satisfied, nor will our successors understand the history of our time unless they fulfill these conditionsoce .



  13. A surprising novel, masquerading as a piece of historical fiction, all very proper inside its fake framing narrative, but also managing to be a spoof murder mystery.The main character is William of Baskerville who has a Watson like side kick He may not use cocaine but he does eat certain herbs and some of his description is lifted from that of a famous resident of Baker Street And wait, a isn t a monastery with it s hidden conflicts, somewhat isolated from everyday life, and desires awfully simi [...]


  14. Truth illusoryUmberto Eco s The Name of the Rose can rightly be called the literary equivalent of a shrewd smuggling operation Surreptitiously sailing under the banner of what seems at first glance to be a traditional and thus holding the promise of mass appeal detective story, the recently deceased Italian semiotician clearly is reaching for a far rich tapestry of genres some tropes of which maintained, others slightly subverted and themes In fact, he himself admitted as such, on the dust jack [...]


  15. 20 February 2016 Umberto Eco died yesterday Sad May he rest in peace and may the gods be with him.I have read some rather amazing books this year but upon reflection this has to be the best Apart from being a gothic thriller set in the late fourteenth century in a monastery, the structure and style of the work is exceptional I really wish though that I had not seen the film with Sean Connery because every time Brother William of Baskerville philosophized or even asked a somewhat ordinary questio [...]


  16. What can I say about The Name of the Rose, besides adding that I loved it Until then I had thought each book spoke of the things, human or divine, that lie outside books Now I realized that not infrequently books speak of books it is as if they spoke among themselves In the light of this reflection, the library seemed all the disturbing to me It was then the place of a long, centuries old murmuring, an imperceptible dialogue between one parchment and another, a living thing, a receptacle of po [...]



  17. 6.0 stars On my list of All Time Favorite novels This incredible book is the newest entry onto my list of favorite novels of all time Reading this book was a one of a kind literary experience that I highly recommend everyone experience The basic plot of the novel is an excellent murder mystery set in an Italian monastery during the 14th century and featuring an excellent Sherlock Holmes type character named William of Baskerville As good as the basic plot is, the real essence of the story is a e [...]


  18. 293 Il nome della rosa The Name of the Rose, Umberto EcoThe Name of the Rose Italian Il nome della rosa is the 1980 debut novel by Italian author Umberto Eco It is a historical murder mystery set in an Italian monastery, in the year 1327, an intellectual mystery combining semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies and literary theory It was translated into English by William Weaver in 1983 2009 1391 880 9789643344344 1394 864 9786005452761 1365 1368 9645511275 1386 160 97896488971 [...]


  19. It is wishful thinking on my part that my review would capture, firstly, and then later, the mood of my bewilderment and disappointment respectively The Name Of The Rose is an ode to ignorance As the saying goes, never attribute to malice what can be attributed to ignorance This medieval tale doesn t feel like a contemporary book, which is the aim of most historical fictions For much of the beginning, politics and theology dominate the proceedings As this story is a mystery at its heart, its dis [...]



  20. This book is both astonishingly difficult and extremely rewarding I had six years of Latin in middle and high school and have taken a course on medieval philosophy and I still found this one both challenging and satisfying Anyone willing to put the work in is going to adore this one.WARNING, however this is not a trashy medieval conspiracy novel This is not a thriller It is an excellent book and a perfect mystery, but it is still set in the 14th century and all of the characters are still monks [...]



  21. Escrevi um romance porque me apeteceu Acho que uma raz o suficiente para algu m se p r a contar uma hist ria Comecei a escrever em 1978, levado por uma ideia seminal Apetecia me envenenar um monge Umberto Eco o t pico livro cebola uma primeira camada com uma hist ria, dentro de outra hist ria, com ramifica es na hist ria real e com figuras reais que interagem com personagens fict cias em situa es tanto reais como imagin rias Um trabalho met dico de um autor conhecido pela sua erudi o, um apaixon [...]


  22. Un texto vasto y poderoso, aunque a veces pudiera parecer un tanto ampuloso dada la erudici n que despliega, durante toda la narraci n, su autor Umberto Eco 1932 2016 , en la cual incluye numerosas frases y p rrafos en lat n, datos sobre la historia del cristianismo, informaci n sobre bot nica, grandes conocimientos sobre libros antiguos, hondas interpretaciones de las escrituras, as como algunas consideraciones filos ficas Dado que el autor adem s de escritor, fil sofo y profesor fue un especia [...]


  23. The Name of the Rose A convoluted and thorny plant of beautyThe Name of the Rose ranks among some of the most complex books read by myself However where works like Paradise Lost or Titus Groan contain their complexity with the power of beautiful flowing prose this novel works at maintaining complexity through its sheer psychological and philosophical depth Added to which the reader can observe that this sophisticated work of fiction is so tightly wound as to form a textual labyrinth like the one [...]


  24. When I found out about Eco s passing about 2 weeks ago, it left a sour taste in my mouth because after owning this book for such a long time, I had finally opened and started to read it For some reason, I felt a bit of remorse for waiting this long to enjoy this well known book like I was supposed to have given my all, my mind, my time but alas, we are all born to die the coincidence makes it of a disconsolate matter Eco s masterpiece and Weaver s immaculate translation of this book are not jus [...]


  25. What a mesmerizing yet sometimes confusing book Five hundred pages, not including the introduction and post script.It is basically consisted of two main plots First was the mysterious murders of monks in an Italian Franciscan abbey on the 14th century, in which a former Inquisitor named William of Baskerville and his novice turned detectives to solve the murders Second was the so called historic meeting between Franciscan leaders favored by the Roman Emperor and their archenemy, representatives [...]


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