The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath go inside Book The Problem of Sylvia Plath Her Poetry and the Necessity of Her JournalsBecause of her suicide at the age of many critics have labeled her

The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath go inside Book The Problem of Sylvia Plath, Her Poetry, and the Necessity of Her JournalsBecause of her suicide at the age of 30, many critics have labeled her either immature or hysterical--while other critics have taken it upon themselves to defend her integrity. Those who have championed her work find they do so at personal cost. Unfortunately, her personal life, and the circumstances surrounding her death have had an adverse effect on how she is read.Quite instinctively, one knows the implications that may be drawn when acknowledging a liking for her poetry. By announcing your admiration for Plath, you may find yourself under suspicion for morbidity, bad taste and even doctrinaire feminism.However, if you believe Plath is one of the more important poets of the 20th century and that she's had a lasting effect on lyric poetry, one cannot deny the import of her work. Although, beware, her work is seen through many lenses. Even admiring lenses can cloud one's judgment. Many admirers make the mistake of imagining Plath to be a Phaedra--a spurned woman, a dangerous woman, and a victim. But the speaker in her poetry is just as multidimensional as Plath was herself. Despite the fact that she wrote from the emotional realities of her life, one cannot stress enough, how important it is to separate the person from the creative result. It is because of this confusion between the two, that the Unabridged Journals bear the burden of illumination. They are a significant contribution to our understanding of Plath and Plath scholarship.The journals allow us to see Plath’s joyful, backbreaking work. They allow us to see the methodical revisions, the many thoughtful ways in which she crafted her poems. They allow us to see the seams and underpinnings necessary in the making of lasting poetry.Though Plath's sensibility is dark, and though she twists nature to her own effect, like so many other poets and fiction writers, there is something uncommon about her work and the strength and momentum that builds poem-to-poem. There is a forcefulness of the persona speaking through her work, and then too, there is her strong inclination toward wholeness and harmony; although, many only see the jaded and sardonic undercurrents.Yet, one of the most important aspects of her work, an aspect that has often been neglected, has to do with the idea of the spirit derailed from its source, and how that spirit is always trying to find its way back to the source. The speaker is constantly in flight, searching for a means of return. This is the dilemma of the soul. It is the dilemma of the artist in his or her calling, and that spiritual pull between the real world and the state of imagining which becomes, through physical and mental exertion, its own state. It is because of this that I maintain that Plath was brilliant and that she created her final poems with genius. Her final book, known as Ariel, was a swift achievement. Many of the poems written in the final months of her life were characterized by a propulsion, or forward momentum, a gallop toward an end. Like Shakespeare’s Ariel, the spirit of Plath’s work appears to be driven toward an understanding of enslavement and the necessity of freedom. The work speaks to the alchemy of person-hood and art formation. For Plath, this was a quest for liberation, and a means to end her suffering. There is a dichotomy between the mechanical and mathematical aspects of poetry and something outside reason. Plath merges form with associative lyricism until the scaffolding of her old style falls away and we are left with Ariel.To know Plath more closely, one may want to read her journals. They give the reader a glimpse into the ways she worked and into the associative powers of her mind. The journals allow the reader to separate the person from the persona. It gives a sense of the ordinary, and humanizes the writer. One sees the struggles she endured, in her daily life, as an imperfect person in the pursuit of her art. And it is "One Art," like Bishop's art, in its own way, so precisely crafted and yet as soon as it is mastered—lost. Unfortunately, some of her journals went missing or were destroyed. But the journals that remain allow a close reader to see some of her ideas before they appeared in print. They give a sense to how she may have approached her work. There is no doubt Sylvia Plath's art was a labor of love. Her euphoria and intensity in the creating of it is tangible. It is important to read the journals, and her poetry as it is appears on the page, and to remember, all art is artifice. All true artists create not just a world, but a mythology within which they exist. Although Plath's mythology may at times be off-putting due to a kind of forcefulness and rancor, it is a distinct voice full of human emotion. The world she creates is recognizable, but only as far as a dream may be recognizable. In truth, what we encounter cannot be Plath herself. Her final poetry is a brilliant invention, prepared by a writer in pursuit of her very best. It is a visionary form: a reality that seems more real, only because of its extreme divergence. Great poets trick their listeners and readers by making the art form feel more real. Perhaps this was her “call,” as Sylvia Plath said so herself. But the call of the reader is to recognize the trick and then to commend the art for brilliant illusions.. First U.S PublicationA major literary event the complete, uncensored journals of Sylvia Plath, published in their entirety for the first time.Sylvia Plath s journals were originally published in 1982 in a heavily abridged version authorized by Plath s husband, Ted Hughes This new edition is an exact and complete transcription of the diaries Plath kept during the last twFirst U.S PublicationA major literary event the complete, uncensored journals of Sylvia Plath, published in their entirety for the first time.Sylvia Plath s journals were originally published in 1982 in a heavily abridged version authorized by Plath s husband, Ted Hughes This new edition is an exact and complete transcription of the diaries Plath kept during the last twelve years of her life Sixty percent of the book is material that has never before been made public, fully revealing the intensity of the poet s personal and literary struggles, and providing fresh insight into both her frequent desperation and the bravery with which she faced down her demons The complete Journals of Sylvia Plath is essential reading for all who have been moved and fascinated by Plath s life and work.. Bestseller Books The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath I decided I was going to read this for two reasons: Sylvia Plath intrigued me; and I need to write better journal entries.It is sometimes hard to wrap your head around the fact that she was so young when she wrote those journals, and constantly I had to keep reminding myself. She seemed extremely mature for her age. I found myself only reading 20, 30 pages at a time, because her words were so full of introspection, I had to continually go back and reread passages and reflect, soul-search about my own life. It was exhausting (and worthwhile).The first half of this book is absolutely remarkable. Especially for being just a journal. After she married, however, I think her tone changed. Her journaling was permanently altered. She made herself so little when compared to the “great Ted Hughes”. She refrained from “nagging” him, but he could nag her, because of his “superior seat”. Out of the pair he was always the better, bigger and smarter in her eyes. Her feminist words of before were somehow not put into action, and she became rather submissive and accepting too much of his behavior and betrayals. I understand her position and era of misogyny, but after being so entirely compelled by this woman’s words, I can’t lie here and say her submission didn’t bother me.The introspection halted and her diaries started resembling a drone list of clipped everyday happenings and to-do lists. The student Sylvia was interesting, incredibly eloquent and contemplative; alive and iridescent, even at her worst depressions. The working, married Sylvia was washed out and colorless. But that’s when she wrote her most important masterpieces. So I suppose she just transplanted her magic from journaling to higher purposes.This book was a long, tough read. Took me forever to finish. But it was more than worth it. Sylvia Plath was something else. Her words transcend journaling.
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath is essential reading for all who have been moved and fascinated by Plath s life and work Read Read less An Book with Buzz The Second Home by Christina Clancy The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath by Sylvia Plath Apr , A major literary event the complete, uncensored journals of Sylvia Plath, published in their entirety for the first time Sylvia Plath s journals were originally published in in a heavily abridged version authorized by Plath s husband, Ted Hughes. The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath by Sylvia Plath Oct , Overview A major literary event the complete, uncensored journals of Sylvia Plath, published in their entirety for the first time Sylvia Plath s journals were originally published in in a heavily abridged version authorized by Plath s husband, Ted Hughes. The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath IndieBound Oct , The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath is essential reading for all who have been moved and fascinated by Plath s life and work About the Author Sylvia Plath The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath A major literary event the complete, uncensored journals of Sylvia Plath, published in their entirety for the first time Sylvia Plath s journals were originally published in in a heavily The Unabridged Journals Of Sylvia Plath ressources java The Unabridged Journals Of Sylvia Plath The Unabridged Journals Of Sylvia Plath is most popular ebook you need You can download any ebooks you wanted like The Unabridged Journals Of Sylvia Plath The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath Quotes by Sylvia Plath Memorable Passages From The Unabridged Journals Of Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath So we drive into a driveway by a big white house with a lot of pillars It s all pillars, I observe brightly That, it seems, is the name of the place The Pillars Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath .

  1. Sylvia Plath was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer.Known primarily for her poetry, Plath also wrote a semi autobiographical novel, The Bell Jar, under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas The book s protagonist, Esther Greenwood, is a bright, ambitious student at Smith College who begins to experience a mental breakdown while interning for a fashion magazine in New York The plot parallels Plath s experience interning at Mademoiselle magazine and subsequent mental breakdown and suicide attempt.Along with Anne Sexton, Plath is credited with advancing the genre of confessional poetry initiated by Robert Lowell and W.D Snodgrass Despite her remarkable artistic, academic, and social success at Smith, Plath suffered from severe depression and underwent a period of psychiatric hospitalization She graduated from Smith with highest honours in 1955 and went on to Newnham College, Cambridge, in England, on a Fulbright fellowship Here she met and married the English poet Ted Hughes in 1956 For the following two years she was an instructor in English at Smith College.In 1960, shortly after Plath and Hughes returned to England from America, her first collection of poems appeared as The Colossus She also gave birth to a daughter, Frieda Rebecca Hughes and Plath s son, Nicholas Farrar, was born in 1962 Plath took her own life on the morning of February 11, 1963 Leaving out bread and milk, she completely sealed the rooms between herself and her sleeping children with wet towels and cloths Plath then placed her head in the oven while the gas was turned on.Her father was Otto Emil Plath.

254 Reply to “The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath”

  1. The Problem of Sylvia Plath, Her Poetry, and the Necessity of Her JournalsBecause of her suicide at the age of 30, many critics have labeled her either immature or hysterical while other critics have taken it upon themselves to defend her integrity Those who have championed her work find they do so at personal cost Unfortunately, her personal life, and the circumstances surrounding her death have had an adverse effect on how she is read.Quite instinctively, one knows the implications that may be [...]


  2. I decided I was going to read this for two reasons Sylvia Plath intrigued me and I need to write better journal entries.It is sometimes hard to wrap your head around the fact that she was so young when she wrote those journals, and constantly I had to keep reminding myself She seemed extremely mature for her age I found myself only reading 20, 30 pages at a time, because her words were so full of introspection, I had to continually go back and reread passages and reflect, soul search about my ow [...]


  3. So it all moves in a pageant towards the ending, it s own ending Everywhere, imperceptibly or otherwise, things are passing, ending, going And there will be other summers, other band concerts, but never this one, never again, never as now Next year I will not be the self of this year now And that is why I laugh at the transient, the ephemeral laugh, while clutching, holding, tenderly, like a fool his toy, cracked glass, water through fingers For all the writing, for all the invention of engines [...]


  4. There were moments reading this book that I had to put it down because the feelings are so vivid you feel like an intruder There are quotes from her journal that decribe in dark detail the feelings that I am sure many women feel as they are on their own for the first time, falling in love, broken hearted, scared of failure, married, aloneLoved this book.


  5. It s astounding how much I relate to Sylvia in these journals I think all feminine beings need to read this Her entries are honest and raw revealing her sensitivities, obsessions, routines, insecuritiesMore intimate than any of her poetry books, Plath s journals offer greater insight into both her personal and literary struggles.This book is of great value to me and I m sure I will continue referring to it for many years.



  6. This is the book that introduced me to Sylvia Plath Her poetry and The Bell Jar would follow I came to appreciate her love for just writing She can make the most mundane interesting To truly have a complete picture of Sylvia Plath, The Journals are integral One of my great thrills was to visit Smith College, and meet Karen Kukil and actually pick up and read the actual journals In the Mortimer rare book room, I was also able to see the drafts of her poems written on the pink Smith College statio [...]



  7. I love people Everybody I love them, I think, as a stamp collector loves his collection Every story, every incident, every bit of conversation is raw material for me My love s not impersonal yet not wholly subjective either I would like to be everyone, a cripple, a dying man, a whore, and then come back to write about my thoughts, my emotions, as that person But I am not omniscient I have to live my life, and it is the only one I ll ever have And you cannot discard your own life with objective c [...]


  8. I will not rate this book It s too hard for me to finish reading I feel like I m intruding I love memoirs, but this is not one This is a collection of raw feelings thoughts Would Sylvia Plath have published her diaries, had she survived Would she have changed them before publication


  9. The individual is an independently acting, and responsible, conscious being rather than what labels, roles, stereotypes, or preconceived notions the individual fits This is what existentialists will tell you This year I ve decided to add diaries and journals to my list of memoirs I love reading because while some prefer the philosophical observations of researched psychology, anthropology, and even social biology, I prefer examining the unalterable part of humanity that we deem the human conditi [...]


  10. it is a chilling experience to read this if you keep a journal of your own you probably understand how odd it is to imagine people around the world curling up with it them i am a self admitted voyeur so i couldn t resist this glimpse into her mind as always, ted had a say in what we and importantly, her children would know of her I destroyed the last of her journals because I did not want her children to have read it in those days I regarded forgetfulness as an essential part of survival yes, i [...]


  11. Sylvia captured her emotions and inner struggles beautifully and narrated everything with such impeccable honesty that it is hard not to like her She seems to me a very evolved person and I do feel bad that she decided to leave the world so soon This book has led me to introspect and look into myself for the emptiness and negativities that a person usually ignores I believe it is very important to understand one s true self and this journal really helps one in doing so.


  12. Sylvia Plath has been an alluring figure in both history and pop culture for decades, both because of her dark, vivid writing and because of her mysterious suicide These non fiction journals are about as close to her mind as anyone will likely ever get.




  13. This just in Sylvia Plath s journals kind of a downer.Also disorganized, vast, incredibly rich I enjoyed the early college years the most, when she s all casually fantastic writing and cycling ecstasy and alienation The later stuff is heavier with self consciousness and deeply frustrating relationships with men She s one of those people that I would be friends with and love dearly, but every year or so I would lose it and snap oh just fucking deal with it, at her.But man could she write Worth it [...]




  14. myvideo video_id 3812080 02 Beginning theme, comforting, like her first diary entries, sounds to me like it is, it is gonna be ok, it is, it is gonna be ok I love people Everybody Every story, every incident, every bit of conversation is raw material for meI have to live my life, it s the only one I ll ever have 00 22 and the theme repeats, but a little stronger this time, emotional, deeper bass, deeper her love for life I want to live and feel all the shades, tones, and variations of mental an [...]


  15. This is a book that would probably be best read the way it was written, a page or two at a time over a period of years Roughly 700 pages at one gulp can be an overdose Plath is a good writer and a perceptive and intelligent woman, but living inside her head for very long isn t comfortable even for an observer Knowing the ending in advance, of course, gives the reader an edge on Plath and adds an unintended layer of irony to many entries and an involuntary little shiver to comments like I desire [...]



  16. I feel like an intruder reading this.Incredibly vast and intricate, even her ordinary accounts of days are almost as eloquent and forceful as her poetry.



  17. A real pot boiler Certainly, this is a dense collection insofar as it is highly evocative of a time, a place, a woman in crisis her emotions, thoughts, conflicts roar off the page into a reader s heart Anyone curious about Sylvia Plath as not only a poet, but a woman of the 50s, and perhaps as a feminist icon or a psychological study will be sorely mistaken not to delve into this collection Plath was a phenomenal woman of the past mid century, and such a loss to the literary world Her journals r [...]


  18. Reading this changed the way I think I know and understand that Plath has been over romanticized since her tragic death, but these journals are the undeniable evidence of her poetic genius Plath found beauty in everything, and her descriptions of internal and external experiences are absolutely stunning.I highly recommend this to anyone interested in Plath, poetry, mental illness, women writers, etc.



  19. In this new edition of Sylvia Plath s Journals, edited by Karen V Kukil, the Associate Curator of Special Collections at Smith College, an exact and complete transcription of the journals kept by Sylvia Plath during the last twelve years of her life has been included, and there are no omissions, deletions or corrections of Plath s words in this edition Her journals, says Kukil, are characterized by the vigorous immediacy with which she records her inner thoughts and feelings and the intricacies [...]


  20. Sylvia Plath s journals are an eye opening education It s a remarkable insight into a brilliant, unique mind Her writing encourages me Her doubts, her fears, the things that made her vulnerable and scared or soft and happy She was intelligent and sophisticated and ahead of her years Her mind was so complex and and yet had so much depth I can say I m haunted by the things she wrote and how relatable they are It s an absolute must read for anyone.


  21. I can t remember where I read it but I recall someone mentioning how worrying it was to relate so much to someone who s life ended so tragically or as they so bluntly put it someone who stuck her head in an oven That stuck with me as my interest in Plath and my knowledge of her and her work grows and especially now that I ve read her diaries The amount of identifying I did with Plath in her diaries early on was of some distress to me She took feelings, vaguely formed thoughts that had been of so [...]


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