The Day of the Locust

Kindle The Day of the Locust As some of you know I came dangerously close to packing it in and

Kindle The Day of the Locust As some of you know, I came dangerously close to packing it in and moving to Los Angeles this winter. I'm from California originally, but the other California, up the Five a ways and then off to the left.... Where I grew up people speak of LA in the same disgusted, dismissive, and morbidly fascinated tones they used to talk about Michael Jackson before he died. The Bay Area is majorly creeped-out by the weirdo plastic-surgery-disaster-of-dubious-morals that is Los Angeles. We hate it for its car culture I guess (though we drive up there too), maybe a little for the vapidly sunny weather (ours isn't bad either), but really what we hate its Entertainment Industry and everything related, everything that represents. We are deeply suspicious and insanely resentful of the mindless, soulless crap produced by Hollywood, of shallow surface beauty, of glitzy superficiality and the tinseled-out dreams and the depressing nightmares we vaguely suspect they must engender. According to Berkeley, LA is full of beautiful idiots who are banally bad people; we, on the other hand, are homely, unkempt, sincere neurotics who drink great coffee and ride our bestickered bikes earnestly to independent bookstores. We are a trustworthy people that judges men, women, or otherwise-gender-identified individuals based on their progressive political views and doctoral dissertations, not on the size of their chests, their last picture's gross, or the sparkle of their smiles! LA is soul-killing. And it's boring and ugly.Anyway, I'm getting a little off-topic here, but I wanted to give some background about my personal programming regarding Hell-A, and especially my horror of Hollywood and its spawn. People in New York are sometimes freaked out by LA but for sort of different reasons -- or in a different way, in any case -- and it was only when I'd tell old Bay Area friends I was moving that their visceral horror drove home the insanity of what I had planned."Why would you ever move there????!" they would cry. "The driving, ugh, and.... the.... the people.... the MOVIE PEOPLE! They're all MOVIE PEOPLE!!!""I know, I know," I'd say. "But I love the weather." It was February in New York and I wanted to kill myself. "And I really, really, really miss.....""You miss...?""I miss the produce."This is the truth. I nearly moved to Los Angeles in large part because I haven't eaten a decent fruit or vegetable in six years. This is one of those things you just take for granted growing up in California: that pretty much any produce you buy is grown reasonably close and fairly recently, and that large quantities of it can be easily procured, pretty much anywhere, all year round. This is simply not the case in New York City. The first time I saw lettuce in a supermarket here, I almost started crying. It looked like something that had been strangled by a serial killer in the Central Valley, stuffed in the trunk of a battered Impala, driven to Brooklyn the long way (via Mexico?), dumped in an alley behind the store, chewed on by some rats, rejected by them, then brought inside and offered for sale at something like $3 a head. This kind of lettuce is fairly standard here. Of course, if you're willing to shell out serious cash you can get something prettier, but you'll notice that will have been grown in California too, if it's even domestic. I know how shitty I feel after traveling across the country, and I don't want eat something that's undergone that ordeal. My solution to dealing with this situation has been to stop eating vegetables, so I basically just survive on pizza and bagels (which are both way better here), and by smoking a pack of mentholated cigarettes whenever I get an artichoke craving.Anyway, for reasons too unbearably shocking and sordid to get into here, I did not wind up moving to LA, so I'm still here in New York. This took some adjustment, especially since it's been late March for about five months now: it just rains all the time and is generally shitty. I spend one-to-three hours every day in an underground tunnel, usually with my face pressed into some stranger's reeking armpit. I trudge through the streets like a goddamn mule, with my bookbag over one shoulder, gym stuff on the other, feeling incredibly frumpy and oppressed. I stagger miles in my heels with my life on my back, usually in the rain, having graphic fantasies about what it must like to have a trunk. A trunk in one's car, which one drives to the supermarket and loads up with Trader Joe's junkfood and a bounty of produce.... fresh, inexpensive, delicious produce, full of nutrients and joy.....Okay, so the other day I got off work, and you know what? It wasn't raining. Finally. And I felt pretty good! I left work and stopped by my friend's bar in Tribeca to shoot the shit a little on the way to my gym, then left him with a little spring in my step, thinking well, this New York City livin' ain't really so bad! It's nice to be able to live one's life on foot, to pay social calls and run errands in a glamorous neighborhood, and who cares it's one so chichi I'd never be able to live there, no matter what unexpected turns my life happens to take? I can stroll from my office, stop and visit a friend, stroll onto the gym and then do a nice long run up alongside the Hudson River. Is this really so bad? It is not. It is not!I felt some kind of something settle in me then, and at that moment I made a new kind of peace with staying in New York. You can have quality of life in this city, I thought, as the summer evening sunshine fell on the cobblestone streets.... and then there, as if to reward me, as I turned the corner, was a huge gorgeous sign for the Tribeca Farmers Market.My heart actually did swell at this point, like it does when the music goes in some great old movie. I've never quite understood why there isn't a Tribeca Farmers Market, seeing as how it's um, the epicenter for well-heeled baby producers who live for just that sort of thing. And this was really the farmers market to end all farmers markets! Like pretty much everything in Tribeca, it gleamed with a patina of expensive specialness that made you just want to buy it. And because it was new, it wasn't crowded at all, even though it was huge, and really seemed to have everything. I don't really go to the Farmers Markets around here too much, mostly because they all seem to close down before I get off work, and then the ones that don't -- like the closest one to me, Saturdays in Park Slope -- always seem to be some big clusterfuck of strollers and pushing, and require a lot more planning and stamina than I feel they're worth.But this Tribeca one was great. All the produce looked incredible, heaped up in these jewel-toned piles of locally-grown, organic goodness. Apples, carrots, greens, onions.... handmade honey, handmade cheese, handmade yogurt, handmade colorful signs in the stalls, all of it just real beautiful and so picturesque. And I strolled through this slowly, not stopping yet, just taking it in as I blissfully thought: "Oh, fuck you, Los Angeles! New York has it all. This place is amazing. Why would I leave, when everything's here? I can live here no problem.... and I won't starve!"I was walking behind these two Scandinavian tourists who'd stopped a little ahead of me to talk to one of the farmers. And what a farmer this guy was! The loveliest farmer for the loveliest farmers market, he was straight from Central Casting: eyes twinkling in his kindly weathered face, greying hair peeking out from his slightly battered fruit-selling hat and curling down over his sun-reddened ears. I slowed down to hear what he was telling the women, who now seemed to be looking around in confusion. The farmer had just said something about Jennifer Lopez."Wait, what?" I interrupted. That's when I noticed the lady with the clipboard who'd just started yelling. "Did you just say this is a set?"The farmer grinned and shrugged apologetically. "We're making a movie.""Of course you are...." I mumbled, shoulders sagging suddenly from the weight of my bags. "Of course there's no Tribeca Farmers Market.""I wish there was," the farmer said. "Try Union Square?""PLACES!" the woman with the clipboard shrieked.The farmer headed back to his stall, and I split. As I stalked down the block, furiously spinning the ball of my Blackberry (the only fruit there's no shortage of in this town, apparently) an LA-looking type clearly crapping his linen pants screamed in my face. "I've got a camera coming through here! Who's letting all these goddamn people walk on this street?""Oh fuck you," I snarled. "I live here. Go back to LA!"So I was really mad when this happened, but pretty soon afterwards I decided I liked it. I decided something else, too, which is that LA is great because Hollywood's great, and Hollywood's great because it's such a wonderful, durable, flexible metaphor. You know the cliche about how things become cliches? The Hollywood metaphor's a great cliche. It's like a basic formulaic plot that's been used a thousand times, and actually a surprisingly large number of movies and books based on it are pretty fabulous. The Day of the Locust isn't the best of them, but it's notable in part because it was written fairly early -- 1939 -- but more because West's own cocktail of sparkling style and abject nihilism is so well-suited to the topic.This book has aged in a couple jarring ways -- like that one of the characters is named Homer Simpson, which you'd think would be fun but for me was actually a terrible distraction. The story is the basic Hollywood-eats-your-soul plot, I guess, except it's extremely bleak and depraved and hardcore and almost psychedelic.... and really lovely and beautiful in a certain kind of way. I didn't think it was the greatest thing ever, and actually They Shoot Horses Don't They? made a much bigger impact on me, though this take on Hollywood in the thirties was way more Literary and more specifically about Hollywood. The Day of the Locust is ultimately a weird but sturdy little black comedy that should be mandatory summer reading for anyone with an interest in Hollywood and riffs on its themes.... which should be most people, really.Why? Because we were totally wrong about LA, growing up in the Bay Area. The entertainment industry isn't a dull, fluffy, fun date movie that's too dumb to think about. Hollywood is ten thousand times more fucked-up and fascinating than anything in Berkeley, and that's why LA's amazing. We didn't get what Hollywood was, looking down at it from the North and thinking there was nothing there beneath all that surface. There's shit crawling around like crazy under the glitter and makeup, which has been pointed out so many times because it truly is a great theme. Hollywood is a fake Farmers Market when you hate your life and you just need fresh greenbeans. Hollywood is fake sets and fake people and gorgeous canyons full of flowers, and aspiring slutty starlets and cynical desperate men and sleazy Racing Form dwarves and cockfighting cowboys and sexy Mexicans and bizarre out-of-place costumes and studios and tequila and rapes and illegal abortions and frightening stage mothers of psychotic child actors and riots and murders and fifty other kinds of insanity..... I'm flipping through and remembering this is actually a pretty awesome book. David Lynch could do an amazing adaptation of this. Why hasn't he? It'd be deadly.Okay, that's enough procrastination for one night, or maybe even for a lifetime. I'm going to go eat some withered spinach out of a bag now, and cry myself to sleep.. The Day of the Locust are Books The Day of the Locust is a novel about Hollywood and its corrupting touch, about the American dream turned into a sun drenched California nightmare Nathanael West s Hollywood is not the glamorous home of the stars but a seedy world of little people, some hopeful, some despairing, all twisted by their by their own desires from the ironically romantic artist narrator tThe Day of the Locust is a novel about Hollywood and its corrupting touch, about the American dream turned into a sun drenched California nightmare Nathanael West s Hollywood is not the glamorous home of the stars but a seedy world of little people, some hopeful, some despairing, all twisted by their by their own desires from the ironically romantic artist narrator to a macho movie cowboy, a middle aged innocent from America s heartland, and the hard as nails call girl would be star whom they all lust after An unforgettable portrayal of a world that mocks the real and rewards the sham, turns its back on love to plunge into empty sex, and breeds a savage violence that is its own undoing, this novel stands as a classic indictment of all that is most extravagant and uncontrolled in American life.. Born Nathanael von Wallenstein Weinstein to prosperous Jewish parents from the first West set about creating his own legend, and anglicising his name was part of that process At Brown University in New York, he befriended writer and humourist S J Perelman who later married his sister , and started writing and drawing cartoons As his cousin Nathan Wallenstein also attended Brown, West took to borrowing his work and presenting it as his own He almost didn t graduate at all, on account of failing a crucial course in modern drama West indulged in a little dramatics of his own and, in tearful contrition, convinced a gullible professor to upgrade his marks.After spending a couple of years in Paris, where he wrote his first novel, The Dream Life of Balso Snell, he returned to New York, where he managed badly by all accounts a small hotel, the Sutton, owned by his family As well as providing free board for struggling friends like Dashiell Hammett, the job also gave West ample opportunity to observe the strange collection of misfits and drifters who congregated in the hotel s drugstore Some of these would appear in West s novel Miss Lonelyhearts.West spent the rest of his days in Hollywood, writing B movie screenplays for small studios and immersing himself in the unglamorous underworld of Tinseltown, with its dope dealers, extras, gangsters, whores and has beens All would end up in West s final masterpiece, The Day of the Locust.West s life ultimately ended as tragically as his fictions Recently married, and with better paid script work coming in, West was happy and successful Then, returning from a trip to Mexico with his wife Eileen, he crashed his car after ignoring a stop sign and killed them both This was just one day after the death of his friend F Scott Fitzgerald.. The best Kindle The Day of the Locust My vote for the Great American Novel - The Day of the Locust by Nathaniel West. Why? West's short novel speaks to what every single American has to deal with - the falsehood of Hollywood, the ultimate con, the complete fake, the billion dollar illusion, shoved in everybody's face, like it or not.As Nathaniel West captured so brilliantly, once anything or anyone is in Hollywood, there is no escape from being converted into artificiality - even a wooden chest of drawers is painted to look like unfinished wood.Adults beating the spontaneity out of children so their kid can be the next Shirley Temple. How twisted. Adults dressing, speaking, moving, expressing themselves in imitation of what they see on the screen. How sick. How appalling. How American.How Nathaniel West captured it all perfectly in this Great American Novel: The Day of the Locust.I love this photo capturing how the five-pointed stars in the Hollywood sidewalk mirror the five-pointed stars in the American flag.
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  1. Born Nathanael von Wallenstein Weinstein to prosperous Jewish parents from the first West set about creating his own legend, and anglicising his name was part of that process At Brown University in New York, he befriended writer and humourist S J Perelman who later married his sister , and started writing and drawing cartoons As his cousin Nathan Wallenstein also attended Brown, West took to borrowing his work and presenting it as his own He almost didn t graduate at all, on account of failing a crucial course in modern drama West indulged in a little dramatics of his own and, in tearful contrition, convinced a gullible professor to upgrade his marks.After spending a couple of years in Paris, where he wrote his first novel, The Dream Life of Balso Snell, he returned to New York, where he managed badly by all accounts a small hotel, the Sutton, owned by his family As well as providing free board for struggling friends like Dashiell Hammett, the job also gave West ample opportunity to observe the strange collection of misfits and drifters who congregated in the hotel s drugstore Some of these would appear in West s novel Miss Lonelyhearts.West spent the rest of his days in Hollywood, writing B movie screenplays for small studios and immersing himself in the unglamorous underworld of Tinseltown, with its dope dealers, extras, gangsters, whores and has beens All would end up in West s final masterpiece, The Day of the Locust.West s life ultimately ended as tragically as his fictions Recently married, and with better paid script work coming in, West was happy and successful Then, returning from a trip to Mexico with his wife Eileen, he crashed his car after ignoring a stop sign and killed them both This was just one day after the death of his friend F Scott Fitzgerald.

654 Reply to “The Day of the Locust”

  1. My vote for the Great American Novel The Day of the Locust by Nathaniel West Why West s short novel speaks to what every single American has to deal with the falsehood of Hollywood, the ultimate con, the complete fake, the billion dollar illusion, shoved in everybody s face, like it or not.As Nathaniel West captured so brilliantly, once anything or anyone is in Hollywood, there is no escape from being converted into artificiality even a wooden chest of drawers is painted to look like unfinished [...]


  2. As some of you know, I came dangerously close to packing it in and moving to Los Angeles this winter I m from California originally, but the other California, up the Five a ways and then off to the left Where I grew up people speak of LA in the same disgusted, dismissive, and morbidly fascinated tones they used to talk about Michael Jackson before he died The Bay Area is majorly creeped out by the weirdo plastic surgery disaster of dubious morals that is Los Angeles We hate it for its car cultur [...]


  3. Rating 3 of five The Publisher Says The Day of the Locust is a novel about Hollywood and its corrupting touch, about the American dream turned into a sun drenched California nightmare Nathaniel West s Hollywood is not the glamorous home of the stars but a seedy world of little people, some hopeful, some desparing, all twisted by their by their own desires from the ironically romantic artist narrator to a macho movie cowboy, a middle aged innocent from America s heartland, and the hard as nails c [...]


  4. I am recommending this book to you because you should read it It is set in 2012 America, as you can see from this quote Their boredom becomes and terrible They realize that they ve been tricked and burn with resentment Every day of their lives they read the newspapers and went to the movies Both fed them on lynchings, murder, sex crimes, explosions, wrecks, love nests, fires, miracles, revolutions, war This daily diet made sophisticates of them The sun is a joke Oranges can t titillate their j [...]


  5. The DeplorablesThere is a theory that at some time in the remote past the North American continental plates shifted and everything that was loose fell into California Day of the Locust confirms this hypothesis.The cast of the novel is a m nage of 1930 s drifters and grifters attracted by the movies, or the climate or the chance for a little unconventional action Mostly they are hapless obsessives who, once there, become lost in either an underworld of vice or some form of otherworldly fundamenta [...]


  6. The Day of the Locust is a very good book about a very bad taste She posed, quivering and balanced, on the doorstep and looked down at the two men in the patio She was smiling, a subtle half smile uncontaminated by thought She looked just born, everything moist and fresh, volatile and perfumed And bad taste, aggravated with mass stupidity, becomes monstrous taste Their boredom becomes and terrible They realize that they ve been tricked and burn with resentment Every day of their lives they rea [...]


  7. We were watching 42nd Street from the tough year of 1933 the other night and my daughter was than somewhat surprised at the risqu nature of some of the zingers in the first 15 minutes, such as Abner, who is bankrolling the new show I d like to do something for you if you d do something for me Dorothy Brock, the leading lady Why, Mr Dillon, I d be very glad to Stage hand You remember Ann Lowell Stage manager Not Anytime Annie Who could forget her She only said no once, when she didn t hear the q [...]


  8. A dark and foreboding look at 1930 s Los Angeles where screen writer Tod Hackett falls for aspiring young actress Fay Greener, but this is a long way from being a love story and has an atmosphere filled with dread, sexual tension and desperate lives, where everything felt like a surreal nightmare than a Hollywood dream, and although on the short side, West captures this era perfectly, where the glitz and glamour of the movie industry becomes an obsession for those with high hopes of hitting the [...]


  9. Book 130 The last book in my 2011 Reading ChallengeJust before I started reading The Day of the Locust, I read something that compared Nathanael West favourably to Hemingway and Fitzgerald, suggesting that his proper place was amongst the literary elite of his day I kept a watchful eye open for anything that hinted at a quality on par with Papa or Scott, but once the book started to take shape, I found myself trying, instead, to find a comparison that could accurately describe how it felt to be [...]


  10. A grim little tale of a pack of losers leading sad and desperate lives in L.A in the 1930 s Tod is an artist with a job at one of the movie studios, and he s in lust with Faye, a wannabe actress with no talent and a sick father, who has made it clear that she has no interest in Tod, but that doesn t stop her from teasing him Homer Simpson Bear in mind that this was written before Matt Groening was even born is a yokel in from Iowa who came to California for his health who apparently has some for [...]


  11. bbc programmes b06p56zjDescription Tod is a young scene designer in 1930s Hollywood trying to earn an honest buck and still maintain his artistic integrity He falls in love with Faye, an aspiring actress and gets sucked into the toxic periphery of Hollywood A caustic satire on the flipside of the 1930s dream factory.


  12. It s both well written and enjoyable I d never heard of this book until it appeared on my recommendations shelf and I ve been trying to figure out why, especially as I then found two copies on the shelf at work Not to mention how very impressive it was.I guess there s only so much room for American literature from the thirties to have lasting worldwide appeal through to 2012 It was never on any syllabus I ever read that s for sure Perhaps it should be Depression era Hollywood certainly seems les [...]


  13. This is where the world endsThis is where the world endsThis is where the world endsIn a poisoned meringue of L.A s winter.This book has amazing characters, incredible scenes, and breaks my heart with every page It set the scene for every David Lynch movie grotesque and the soundtrack for every Pixies song your head can bend itself around Also, the best cock fight scene in all of literature.


  14. I re read this for a recent book club and found myself appreciating it much than I did back in college Since the book didn t change, I d have to say that perhaps the wisdom of years has deepened my understanding of the complexity and nuance regarding absurdity in the human character I once thought the book was dry and overly cynical No longer In a city full of strangeness, the people inhabiting West s Hollywood novel seem sharp and current On the back cover of my ancient copy, the blurb says t [...]


  15. About a year ago, I purchased Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust as a Kindle twofer I read Miss Lonelyhearts a few months back, and finally got around to reading the longer novel Many people love The Day of the Locust, while an equally large group does not I m in the latter group.When it comes to certain novels, I always wonder if people love it for the sake of saying they love it There s a certain cachet that comes with tossing out references to slightly obscure yet classic novels It d [...]


  16. Ne to je trulo u tvornici snova, ma ineriji koja guta ljude i tjera ih da izgube sebe.Sjaj Hollywooda la an je, a kroz taj sjaj provla e se razli ite nakaze kao stvorene za vje nu igru, stvorene da izgube sve.


  17. I had a hard time deciding to finish the book after the first mention of Tod Hackett s thoughts about the courage to rape a teenager but I forget You re not supposed to like the characters in this story Tod is the protagonist, the straight man in this black comedy Tod is self aware and slick but still a naive outsider, in many ways Like the lost inhabitants in Los Angeles, he is not that different compared to his midwest foil, Homer Simpson The highlights of this novel are in the parade of minor [...]


  18. The Day of The Locust has a dead horse in a Hollywood pool, a cock fight, a Mexican, a cowboy and plenty of other strange things, people and happenings I loved the book.Why The Day of The Locust I wondered an explanation found online where else is that the locust refers to Tod, the main character.I ve also read that.e fierce critique of Hollywood, and the mentality of the masses, depicts an America that is both sick with vanity, while also harboring a malignant sense of perversity I disagree wit [...]


  19. Nathaniel West s examination of the vain, desperate, self deluded hangers on at the fringes of Hollywood is perhaps pertinent today than it was seventy years ago if for no other reason than that these pathetic archetypes seem to be even among us today, no longer mere aberrations, as they were in West s day You have Homer Simpson no, not that Homer Simpson a weak, cowardly, deeply depressed man searching for a hint of meaning in his life Abe Kusich, a nasty, smart aleck of a dwarf, anxious for [...]


  20. Depressing, crushing realization that the American dream isn t all it s cracked up to be, and that Hollywood glitz and glamour is just going to screw you up sooner or later.This is the Golden Age of Hollywood, full of beautiful actresses, movies, hopes and passion Tod Hackett gets caught up in this world when he finds himself in an LA studio, working as a set designer As well as Tod, there s a whole bunch of unfortunate characters pulled into this spotlighted charade, most notably Faye a wannabe [...]


  21. Far different than anything I could imagine, but brilliant nonetheless Rather than a hollywood story , we get Hollywood as Babylon It s apocalyptic, surreal, lurching from one grotesque scene to another every thought of sex tainted by rape, every cheap thrill one breath away from violence Strangely I m reminded a little of JG Ballard s books of urban decay, like Concrete Island and High Rise Dark, cynical, bitter, and horrifying, the book gives us a heavy caricature of this city I live in, but i [...]


  22. If Sunset Boulevard had a bastard child with Tom Waits Blue Valentine and it went to Hollywood failed and died alone in a seedy hotel room from falling asleep while smoking a cigarette would be this book.


  23. In a nutshell, The Day of the Locust is The Great Gatsby meets 1930s Hollywood as opposed to being set in 1920s jazz era New York , as both novels encompass the feeling of depravity and depression that was common in American novels of this time period.I can sum up both the Great Gatsby and Day of the Locust as follows our protagonist is the every man wallflower that the reader follows as he explores a sector of life foreign to that of his own He witnesses the dead dying hopes of the people aroun [...]


  24. This almost reminded me of Shirley Jackson not in its tone or theme, but in its oddness Like, here s this West guy just off doing his weird thing and I don t even know whether it s funny or tragic It might be because I just finished Sun Also Rises, but the whole book seemed sortof like a parody of that Parody might not be the right word A small scale version A diorama With cockfighting instead of bullfighting Faye Greener is like a smaller, tawdry Brett.


  25. Only those who still have hope can benefit from tears When they finish, they feel better But to those without hope, whose anguish is basic and permanent, no good comes from crying Nothing changes for them They usually know this, but still can t help crying West has incredible writing that perfectly describes hopelessness and depression It s sad but real The short chapters and sentence structures made it easier to read than I thought.


  26. LOTS OF SPOILERS I am conflicted about this novel hence, three stars I almost gave it four though It is very well written.Here we have a novel about Hollywood NOT Los Angeles I am a native Angelino and have lived here my entire life It s an odd relationship we natives have with HollywoodI m talking about Hollywood the Concept, not Hollywood the Actual Place The thing about Hollywood is, only people from elsewhere are interested in it Indeed, it was people from elsewhere who created it in the fir [...]


  27. I recently re read this to mine for good quotes because I m writing a research paper for class about Clara Bow s last two movies from 1932 and 1933, the period in Hollywood history this is set in There is probably a elegant way to construct that sentence, but I don t care I m too tired and still finals ridden But The Day of the Locust is a relentlessly grim, grotesque, absurd novel from one of the best writers of the early 20th century and you should read it Full stop although Miss Lonelyhearts [...]


  28. Wayyyyy ahead of its time The cult of personality The addiction to celebrity The antagonism by some toward the addiction to celebrity Hollywood as cesspool Drag queens Drug abuse Stunning character portraits A peculiar presentation Mostly clear, direct language Hubert Selby like by way of Hemingway All in 1939.


  29. Whimsical and witty it may be, The Day of the Locust is ultimately too insubstantial to really care about There s a flatness to both the characters and the prose that makes them easy to forget, and the plot, a satiric wink at 30s melodrama, feels strained.


  30. Nathanael West kan mca B y k Buhran yans tmada edeb olarak Fitzgerald dan ok daha g l Hollywood un California daki bir grup yabanc la m ayd n n zerindeki etkilerini verirken karamizah n kendine has bir rne ini sergiliyor Yer yer Ye il am melodramlar n and ran sahneler Faye ile Tod Hackett aras ndaki ili ki, Hackett n k busa d nen ya am vd roman n g c n azaltsa da Amerikan edebiyat n n nitelikli rneklerinden ekirgenin G n.


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